County Supervisor’s Race Heats Up

So far it has been a quiet campaign season for the open Fourth Supervisorial District. But that figures to change for the seat vacated by Incumbent Mariko Yamada’s run for State Assembly.

Last Friday, John Ferrera filed his papers to make his run official and yesterday Jim Provenza filed his.

John Ferrera, who did not send the Vanguard a press release, was quoted in the Davis Enterprise.

“I know it’s a little corny, but we’re taking a leap — leaping into leadership on leap year day… I like the symbolism… I’m excited to take responsibility for making tough decisions and working to leave things better than we found them.

I’ve committed myself to public service for 22 years, working on the issues we face here in Yolo County — creating a long-term vision for preserving and enhancing our environment, supporting agriculture and the economy and providing for those who need our help.

Now, I am committing myself to four years of service to the residents of the 4th District and Yolo County as a whole. It seems appropriate to do it on a day that happens once every four years.”

Meanwhile Former Davis School Board Member Jim Provenza in a release sent to the Vanguard wrote among other things:

“Local experience will play an important role when evaluating candidates for your next county supervisor… I am proud to have served for the past four years as a Davis school board member and most recently as President of the Davis Joint Unified School District. My wife and I have been actively involved in the Davis community for over 15 years. Our children attended and graduated from the Davis schools. I am a lawyer with a degree from UC Davis School of Law.

As president of the board, Provenza was instrumental in winning back 4.5 million dollars owed by the state for Montgomery School. He fought for improvements in special education and was responsible for priorities that deliver excellence in education for all students while improving the performance and test scores of students who struggle to succeed.

As county supervisor, I will continue to be a strong advocate for the people of Davis. My priorities will be to preserve open space and farmland, promote accessible government and improve services for seniors, children, the disabled, and crime victims. I will also build a sound county budget by pursuing all available state and federal funds.”

Campaign rhetoric is one thing. But the most telling aspect of any campaign is probably who signs one’s nomination papers. It indicates depth of support, how many public figures have signed, and of course from the stand point of the voters–what side of the local political debate the office seeker stands on.

Based on both endorsers and signees, these two candidates appear on paper to be rather evenly matched. Personally, who signs the paper is a bit more important for this race than who endorsed, because the nomination paper signers have to live in the person’s district.

John Ferrera’s papers were signed by among others:

City Councilmember Stephen Souza, Former City Councilmember Ted Puntillo (I believe), School Board member Richard Harris, Former School Board Members Marty West and Keltie Jones, Former County Supervisor Betsy Marchard (who represented this district previously). The most important signature is from wife, Anna Ferrera. Others include former Superintendent Floyd Fenocchio, Kevin Wolf, Chuck Cunningham, Michael Levy, Kathy Tyzzer, Velma Lagerstrom, Bob Segar, Robin Kulakow, Bill Julian, Curt Augustine, Colleen Beamish, Jim Becket, Janet Berry, Rex Berry, Alan Brownstein, Wendy Chason, Bob Chason, Randy Chinn, Jonathan Clay, Colleen Connolly, Ann Costello, Starr Walton Hurley, Estell Jones, John Jones, Pat King, Elisa Levy, Sandy Pellegrini, Brian Sway, Janellyn and Terry Whittier, Katy Zane and Richard Zeiger.

Jim Provenza’s papers were signed by among other other:

Current Yolo County Supervisor Mariko Yamada, City Council Member Lamar Heystek, School Board members Sheila Allen and Gina Daleiden, Former School Board member B.J. Kline, Former State Superintendent of School Delaine Eastin, Eli Fairclough who represents Mike Thomspon. The most important signature is from wife, Donna Provenza. Others include Robin Souza, Rick Gonzales, Jr., Sheryl Patterson, Holly Bishop, Pam Nieberg, Rose Calabria, Debra Hartnett, Harry Ohlendorf, Rev. Tim Malone, Bob Hagedorn, Heidy Kellison, Renee Liston, Nancy Peterson, Peter Kellison, Davis Democratic Club President Arun Sen, Eleanor Lake, Phillip Reedy, Carl Vandagriff, Edward Peter Hartnett, Lois Bixson, Cory Gold, Edith Gold, Ann Marty, Gayle Henreid, Cameron Black, Jennifer Hagedorn, Jane Reedy, Barbara Ohlendorf, Tom Adams, and Junko Kanaya-Adams.

There will be a number of interesting subtexts in this battle to determine who wins the Fourth Supervisorial District. Things ought to get interesting from here on out. One thing appears clear–the lines in this race appear fairly well-defined. The Vanguard will be closely covering this race that will have important implications as the General Plan process at the County Level continues to move forward and the debate over Davis’ borders and peripheral development heats up once again.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

Author

  • David Greenwald

    Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Categories:

Elections

60 comments

  1. Well it makes since most are in Helen’s district, the only one I can think of is Bill Kopper and he has endorsed Jim. Sue, Partansky, Harrington, Wagstaff et al, live in the second.

  2. Well it makes since most are in Helen’s district, the only one I can think of is Bill Kopper and he has endorsed Jim. Sue, Partansky, Harrington, Wagstaff et al, live in the second.

  3. Well it makes since most are in Helen’s district, the only one I can think of is Bill Kopper and he has endorsed Jim. Sue, Partansky, Harrington, Wagstaff et al, live in the second.

  4. Well it makes since most are in Helen’s district, the only one I can think of is Bill Kopper and he has endorsed Jim. Sue, Partansky, Harrington, Wagstaff et al, live in the second.

  5. Anonymous 9:51 am:
    Are you implying that the “elected progressive leadership” are endorsing Ferrero? Or are you complaining that they were left out? Or maybe you are noting that they may be chosing to be uninvolved or uninterested in the local election?

  6. Anonymous 9:51 am:
    Are you implying that the “elected progressive leadership” are endorsing Ferrero? Or are you complaining that they were left out? Or maybe you are noting that they may be chosing to be uninvolved or uninterested in the local election?

  7. Anonymous 9:51 am:
    Are you implying that the “elected progressive leadership” are endorsing Ferrero? Or are you complaining that they were left out? Or maybe you are noting that they may be chosing to be uninvolved or uninterested in the local election?

  8. Anonymous 9:51 am:
    Are you implying that the “elected progressive leadership” are endorsing Ferrero? Or are you complaining that they were left out? Or maybe you are noting that they may be chosing to be uninvolved or uninterested in the local election?

  9. I have nothing against Ferrara. I’ve met him once or twice in the past couple months and he seems like a nice guy.

    But am I the only one tired of these people who come out of nowhere to run for office? All of the sudden they are joining various clubs and gladhanding at every event. I’ve lived here a while. I’m not a political junkie, but I know much more about who is involved in things than the average citizen. Six months ago I’d never heard of John Ferrera or Sydney Vergis. Now he’s running for supervisor and she’s running for council.

  10. I have nothing against Ferrara. I’ve met him once or twice in the past couple months and he seems like a nice guy.

    But am I the only one tired of these people who come out of nowhere to run for office? All of the sudden they are joining various clubs and gladhanding at every event. I’ve lived here a while. I’m not a political junkie, but I know much more about who is involved in things than the average citizen. Six months ago I’d never heard of John Ferrera or Sydney Vergis. Now he’s running for supervisor and she’s running for council.

  11. I have nothing against Ferrara. I’ve met him once or twice in the past couple months and he seems like a nice guy.

    But am I the only one tired of these people who come out of nowhere to run for office? All of the sudden they are joining various clubs and gladhanding at every event. I’ve lived here a while. I’m not a political junkie, but I know much more about who is involved in things than the average citizen. Six months ago I’d never heard of John Ferrera or Sydney Vergis. Now he’s running for supervisor and she’s running for council.

  12. I have nothing against Ferrara. I’ve met him once or twice in the past couple months and he seems like a nice guy.

    But am I the only one tired of these people who come out of nowhere to run for office? All of the sudden they are joining various clubs and gladhanding at every event. I’ve lived here a while. I’m not a political junkie, but I know much more about who is involved in things than the average citizen. Six months ago I’d never heard of John Ferrera or Sydney Vergis. Now he’s running for supervisor and she’s running for council.

  13. 3:33 – Had you ever heard of Jim Provenza before he ran for school board?

    Something I don’t know – Is there any philosophical difference or disagreement on the issues between these two men?

    Because Provenza is better known, I wonder what reason voters would have to choose Ferrera?

  14. 3:33 – Had you ever heard of Jim Provenza before he ran for school board?

    Something I don’t know – Is there any philosophical difference or disagreement on the issues between these two men?

    Because Provenza is better known, I wonder what reason voters would have to choose Ferrera?

  15. 3:33 – Had you ever heard of Jim Provenza before he ran for school board?

    Something I don’t know – Is there any philosophical difference or disagreement on the issues between these two men?

    Because Provenza is better known, I wonder what reason voters would have to choose Ferrera?

  16. 3:33 – Had you ever heard of Jim Provenza before he ran for school board?

    Something I don’t know – Is there any philosophical difference or disagreement on the issues between these two men?

    Because Provenza is better known, I wonder what reason voters would have to choose Ferrera?

  17. You need to start somewhere when you run for office. In California school boards and city councils are the place where people usually start unless they have something else going for them like Arnold or Corzine. So the higher up you start the harder it is to get in. Now Supervisor is not that high up but it certainly suggests that Ferrara is connected and has some sort of jump start to his career.

  18. You need to start somewhere when you run for office. In California school boards and city councils are the place where people usually start unless they have something else going for them like Arnold or Corzine. So the higher up you start the harder it is to get in. Now Supervisor is not that high up but it certainly suggests that Ferrara is connected and has some sort of jump start to his career.

  19. You need to start somewhere when you run for office. In California school boards and city councils are the place where people usually start unless they have something else going for them like Arnold or Corzine. So the higher up you start the harder it is to get in. Now Supervisor is not that high up but it certainly suggests that Ferrara is connected and has some sort of jump start to his career.

  20. You need to start somewhere when you run for office. In California school boards and city councils are the place where people usually start unless they have something else going for them like Arnold or Corzine. So the higher up you start the harder it is to get in. Now Supervisor is not that high up but it certainly suggests that Ferrara is connected and has some sort of jump start to his career.

  21. I think the problem is that they didn’t hold office before and more that they had not been involved in the community before, Vergis more so than Ferrera.

  22. I think the problem is that they didn’t hold office before and more that they had not been involved in the community before, Vergis more so than Ferrera.

  23. I think the problem is that they didn’t hold office before and more that they had not been involved in the community before, Vergis more so than Ferrera.

  24. I think the problem is that they didn’t hold office before and more that they had not been involved in the community before, Vergis more so than Ferrera.

  25. City council is an entry level elected position. Vergis is starting at a reasonable level for a beginning would be elected official. The question for her is what does she bring to the election debate that is not already being articulated by three other candidates since there are three seats open in this cycle.

  26. City council is an entry level elected position. Vergis is starting at a reasonable level for a beginning would be elected official. The question for her is what does she bring to the election debate that is not already being articulated by three other candidates since there are three seats open in this cycle.

  27. City council is an entry level elected position. Vergis is starting at a reasonable level for a beginning would be elected official. The question for her is what does she bring to the election debate that is not already being articulated by three other candidates since there are three seats open in this cycle.

  28. City council is an entry level elected position. Vergis is starting at a reasonable level for a beginning would be elected official. The question for her is what does she bring to the election debate that is not already being articulated by three other candidates since there are three seats open in this cycle.

  29. About Jim’s nomination papers: the obviously missing names suggest that he did not want to be “labeled” as in the corner of the progressive elected leaders. His district is more conservative than Helen’s, so maybe that was a good tactical decision by Jim? And is certainly appears to have been an affirmative choice.

    But the problem is: his unfocsed list suggests that no one really feels a significant buy-in to his candidacy. And that is exactly the opening that Ferrero is exploiting.

    I personally hope that Jim wins, but it was his race to lose, and he gave the opening to Ferrero.

  30. About Jim’s nomination papers: the obviously missing names suggest that he did not want to be “labeled” as in the corner of the progressive elected leaders. His district is more conservative than Helen’s, so maybe that was a good tactical decision by Jim? And is certainly appears to have been an affirmative choice.

    But the problem is: his unfocsed list suggests that no one really feels a significant buy-in to his candidacy. And that is exactly the opening that Ferrero is exploiting.

    I personally hope that Jim wins, but it was his race to lose, and he gave the opening to Ferrero.

  31. About Jim’s nomination papers: the obviously missing names suggest that he did not want to be “labeled” as in the corner of the progressive elected leaders. His district is more conservative than Helen’s, so maybe that was a good tactical decision by Jim? And is certainly appears to have been an affirmative choice.

    But the problem is: his unfocsed list suggests that no one really feels a significant buy-in to his candidacy. And that is exactly the opening that Ferrero is exploiting.

    I personally hope that Jim wins, but it was his race to lose, and he gave the opening to Ferrero.