Guest Commentary: YES On Q for Quality Schools in Davis

8,400 students
600 classrooms

Tomorrow’s doctors, teachers, mechanics, physicists, inventors, musicians, farmers, scientists, entrepreneurs, authors, leaders …

On Tuesday, November 6, voters in the Davis Joint Unified School District will be asked to renew the District’s instructional program parcel tax. Your YES vote for Measure Q is an investment in the future for 8,400 Davis school children and for Davis. As a community, we are defined in large part by our commitment to our schools and to education. The outstanding quality of Davis schools makes Davis a special place to live, whether or not you have children in the school system.

The local funding generated by Measure Q is vital to preserve and maintain the many classroom programs cherished by our community. We are speaking to friends, neighbors, and fellow Davis residents at every opportunity to explain the critical importance of Measure Q. Without Measure Q, Davis schools will not have the funds to support many current educational programs that make our District unique. Your support of Measure Q will make a difference at every school across Davis, Kindergarten through high school.

Renewal of the parcel tax will allow the District to continue to fund:

• Class size reduction at elementary schools
• Reading programs that form the basis for future academic achievement
• Class periods and teachers so our secondary schools can offer music, art, foreign language, additional AP courses, and career/technical classes
• School counselors, nurses, and student support
• Additional library hours for greater access
• School-based technology support
• classroom materials
• Training for our teachers and staff

A modest increase of $34 per homeowner will not only maintain these vital, ongoing programs over the next four years but will additionally fund:

• Improvements in school lunch nutrition with more farm fresh produce
• Math specialists for grades 4-6 to prepare students to reach their highest math potential in Junior High and High School and as they enter college or career

In very real terms, Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class in grades K-3 instead of 30 crowded together. Measure Q is about continuing a 7th period at secondary schools (unusual in surrounding areas) to allow students to take both foreign language and art, or to be a part of the world class Madrigals, Orchestra, or Band. Measure Q is about being able to offer a class in agricultural biology or mechanics or biotechnology. Measure Q is about academic counselors to help students find a path to college and a crisis counselor to help students find a path away from harm. Measure Q is about support for our English Learners and at-risk students. Measure Q is about reading and math specialists to ensure academic and lifelong success for all of our students.

Measure Q is specifically designed to increase these classroom resources, and for just 55 cents per day per homeowner, we can deliver the difference for our students. This is not a new tax–Measure Q simply asks voters to renew a commitment to educational excellence they first made in 1983 – and which they have renewed every four years since.

There are two new features to this renewal of the parcel tax. First, a Citizen’s Oversight Committee will oversee every penny to ensure the community can see and understand that Measure Q funding directly supports the classroom and funds exactly what is delineated in the ballot measure. We’re excited to offer our community and business members a way to participate in the oversight along with the citizen-elected school board. Second, a senior exemption is available. We are appreciative of the generosity and support of many of our seniors, and understand the difficulties of a limited income. Therefore, a full exemption is available to those 65 and older who request it at the business office at DJUSD.

The Davis community has built a wonderful environment for student learning and the Davis Joint Unified School District continues to advance the goals we share for student success. Our students are thriving by many measures including graduation rates, college and career placements, as well as API and Exit Exam scores. As School Board Trustees, Davis residents, and Moms, we are grateful for the generous investment the community has made in our children by passing a local parcel tax measure every four years since 1983. This is a remarkable accomplishment achieved by only a handful of school districts in California, and, in fact, Davis led the way as one of the first in the State. It is, perhaps, not surprising that districts that have the support of their communities through local parcel tax measures also are among the highest performing districts in the state. And in Davis, we are doing as much with much less, even with our parcel tax for our instructional program. DJUSD has $7,392 to spend per pupil, while comparison districts such as Palo Alto spend $12, 461. Look at the results, think of our children and our town, and step forward to be counted in support of our future: the children of Davis.

We seek your help once again on November 6 to continue this “quintessentially Davis” tradition with the passage of Measure Q. Please join us in maintaining the high quality of a Davis public school education. Our quality of life depends on the quality of our Davis schools. Vote Yes on Measure Q!

Sheila Allen and Gina Daleiden
Co-Coordinators of Measure Q campaign
DJUSD Trustees

Sheila Allen and Gina Daleiden are elected members of the Davis Joint Unified School District’s Board of Education.

Author

  • David Greenwald

    Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Categories:

Elections

112 comments

  1. “In very real terms, Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class in grades K-3 instead of 30 crowded together.”

    Doesn’t state law require all K-3 classrooms to have no more than 20 students? If this is true, then your claim that “Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class” is empty rhetoric, if not a lie.

  2. “In very real terms, Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class in grades K-3 instead of 30 crowded together.”

    Doesn’t state law require all K-3 classrooms to have no more than 20 students? If this is true, then your claim that “Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class” is empty rhetoric, if not a lie.

  3. “In very real terms, Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class in grades K-3 instead of 30 crowded together.”

    Doesn’t state law require all K-3 classrooms to have no more than 20 students? If this is true, then your claim that “Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class” is empty rhetoric, if not a lie.

  4. “In very real terms, Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class in grades K-3 instead of 30 crowded together.”

    Doesn’t state law require all K-3 classrooms to have no more than 20 students? If this is true, then your claim that “Measure Q is about having 20 young students per class” is empty rhetoric, if not a lie.

  5. I believe there is some explaining to do.
    1. I think the School Board went overboard a little bit in reducing class size at Valley Oak, don’t you think? Taxpayers faithfully voted for increases to the parcel tax again and again – yet a school was closed while we are paying for two Superintendents at astronomical salaries, one of whom will not even be working.

    2. How do we know the Citizen Oversight Committee is not peppered with friends of the School Board? How were they chosen? Citizen Oversight Committees are only as good as the people on them. And how much power do they have? If they are anything like the city commissions, they can only advise the School Board, not make any substantive changes to School Board policy. How about a truly independent Oversight Committee with some teeth to it that the School Board CANNOT IGNORE?

    3. Seniors on fixed incomes who qualify can get a tax exemption. How about families with young children who cannot afford this tax either? Remember, there is a school tax, library tax, water and sewer increases, lighting and landscaping tax, etc., etc., etc.

    4. The School Board claims lack of funding for basic programs as the need for an increase in the parcel tax; then claims the need is for new programs; then claims the need is to save music and art programs…Sounds to me like the School Board isn’t quite clear on what it wants the money for. It just knows it wants more money. Don’t we all. The only thing is, its our money.

    5. Why are we closing Valley Oak, at the same time we are building a new elementary school in South Davis? Could it be there is only so much funding for 9 elementary schools, so one was closed to make way for the other? Could that be because we are paying ridiculous amounts of money for administrative salaries – including for one Superintendent that will be doing nothing – while letting our teachers suffer the consequences of inadequate salaries?

    6. How about if the School Board gets its fiscal house in order before we taxpayers shell out any more money that is just going to go down the rat hole into oblivion? I mean really, paying a superintendent $240,000 a year to not work; forcing teachers to pay a third of their salary for medical insurance; building a new school while closing another; failing to send a grant application for $4.5 million in on time; forgetting to set aside the necessary funding to build King High; and the list goes on.

    7. These same scare tactics have been used year after year (if you don’t vote for a tax increase your children will suffer, basic services will have to be cut) to extort money from the taxpayer. And what was the result? Bad fiscal management because we keep giving the School Board a blank check.

    I for one have had enough. I was willing to wait and see what the School Board gave as reasons to vote for Measure Q before I decided, to show they would be more fiscally responsible. All I have seen is the same old tactics used, with nothing to guarantee we won’t get more of the same. As far as I can see, its business as usual. The only way anything will change is if Valley Oak survives as a charter school, and citizens rise up and vote no on Measure Q. Then the School Board can come back with a better attitude, and maybe citizens will rethink things.

    Better yet, burn the midnight oil now, convince me the School Board is going to be more responsible because systems are in place to make sure, and maybe you will change my mind.

  6. I believe there is some explaining to do.
    1. I think the School Board went overboard a little bit in reducing class size at Valley Oak, don’t you think? Taxpayers faithfully voted for increases to the parcel tax again and again – yet a school was closed while we are paying for two Superintendents at astronomical salaries, one of whom will not even be working.

    2. How do we know the Citizen Oversight Committee is not peppered with friends of the School Board? How were they chosen? Citizen Oversight Committees are only as good as the people on them. And how much power do they have? If they are anything like the city commissions, they can only advise the School Board, not make any substantive changes to School Board policy. How about a truly independent Oversight Committee with some teeth to it that the School Board CANNOT IGNORE?

    3. Seniors on fixed incomes who qualify can get a tax exemption. How about families with young children who cannot afford this tax either? Remember, there is a school tax, library tax, water and sewer increases, lighting and landscaping tax, etc., etc., etc.

    4. The School Board claims lack of funding for basic programs as the need for an increase in the parcel tax; then claims the need is for new programs; then claims the need is to save music and art programs…Sounds to me like the School Board isn’t quite clear on what it wants the money for. It just knows it wants more money. Don’t we all. The only thing is, its our money.

    5. Why are we closing Valley Oak, at the same time we are building a new elementary school in South Davis? Could it be there is only so much funding for 9 elementary schools, so one was closed to make way for the other? Could that be because we are paying ridiculous amounts of money for administrative salaries – including for one Superintendent that will be doing nothing – while letting our teachers suffer the consequences of inadequate salaries?

    6. How about if the School Board gets its fiscal house in order before we taxpayers shell out any more money that is just going to go down the rat hole into oblivion? I mean really, paying a superintendent $240,000 a year to not work; forcing teachers to pay a third of their salary for medical insurance; building a new school while closing another; failing to send a grant application for $4.5 million in on time; forgetting to set aside the necessary funding to build King High; and the list goes on.

    7. These same scare tactics have been used year after year (if you don’t vote for a tax increase your children will suffer, basic services will have to be cut) to extort money from the taxpayer. And what was the result? Bad fiscal management because we keep giving the School Board a blank check.

    I for one have had enough. I was willing to wait and see what the School Board gave as reasons to vote for Measure Q before I decided, to show they would be more fiscally responsible. All I have seen is the same old tactics used, with nothing to guarantee we won’t get more of the same. As far as I can see, its business as usual. The only way anything will change is if Valley Oak survives as a charter school, and citizens rise up and vote no on Measure Q. Then the School Board can come back with a better attitude, and maybe citizens will rethink things.

    Better yet, burn the midnight oil now, convince me the School Board is going to be more responsible because systems are in place to make sure, and maybe you will change my mind.

  7. I believe there is some explaining to do.
    1. I think the School Board went overboard a little bit in reducing class size at Valley Oak, don’t you think? Taxpayers faithfully voted for increases to the parcel tax again and again – yet a school was closed while we are paying for two Superintendents at astronomical salaries, one of whom will not even be working.

    2. How do we know the Citizen Oversight Committee is not peppered with friends of the School Board? How were they chosen? Citizen Oversight Committees are only as good as the people on them. And how much power do they have? If they are anything like the city commissions, they can only advise the School Board, not make any substantive changes to School Board policy. How about a truly independent Oversight Committee with some teeth to it that the School Board CANNOT IGNORE?

    3. Seniors on fixed incomes who qualify can get a tax exemption. How about families with young children who cannot afford this tax either? Remember, there is a school tax, library tax, water and sewer increases, lighting and landscaping tax, etc., etc., etc.

    4. The School Board claims lack of funding for basic programs as the need for an increase in the parcel tax; then claims the need is for new programs; then claims the need is to save music and art programs…Sounds to me like the School Board isn’t quite clear on what it wants the money for. It just knows it wants more money. Don’t we all. The only thing is, its our money.

    5. Why are we closing Valley Oak, at the same time we are building a new elementary school in South Davis? Could it be there is only so much funding for 9 elementary schools, so one was closed to make way for the other? Could that be because we are paying ridiculous amounts of money for administrative salaries – including for one Superintendent that will be doing nothing – while letting our teachers suffer the consequences of inadequate salaries?

    6. How about if the School Board gets its fiscal house in order before we taxpayers shell out any more money that is just going to go down the rat hole into oblivion? I mean really, paying a superintendent $240,000 a year to not work; forcing teachers to pay a third of their salary for medical insurance; building a new school while closing another; failing to send a grant application for $4.5 million in on time; forgetting to set aside the necessary funding to build King High; and the list goes on.

    7. These same scare tactics have been used year after year (if you don’t vote for a tax increase your children will suffer, basic services will have to be cut) to extort money from the taxpayer. And what was the result? Bad fiscal management because we keep giving the School Board a blank check.

    I for one have had enough. I was willing to wait and see what the School Board gave as reasons to vote for Measure Q before I decided, to show they would be more fiscally responsible. All I have seen is the same old tactics used, with nothing to guarantee we won’t get more of the same. As far as I can see, its business as usual. The only way anything will change is if Valley Oak survives as a charter school, and citizens rise up and vote no on Measure Q. Then the School Board can come back with a better attitude, and maybe citizens will rethink things.

    Better yet, burn the midnight oil now, convince me the School Board is going to be more responsible because systems are in place to make sure, and maybe you will change my mind.

  8. I believe there is some explaining to do.
    1. I think the School Board went overboard a little bit in reducing class size at Valley Oak, don’t you think? Taxpayers faithfully voted for increases to the parcel tax again and again – yet a school was closed while we are paying for two Superintendents at astronomical salaries, one of whom will not even be working.

    2. How do we know the Citizen Oversight Committee is not peppered with friends of the School Board? How were they chosen? Citizen Oversight Committees are only as good as the people on them. And how much power do they have? If they are anything like the city commissions, they can only advise the School Board, not make any substantive changes to School Board policy. How about a truly independent Oversight Committee with some teeth to it that the School Board CANNOT IGNORE?

    3. Seniors on fixed incomes who qualify can get a tax exemption. How about families with young children who cannot afford this tax either? Remember, there is a school tax, library tax, water and sewer increases, lighting and landscaping tax, etc., etc., etc.

    4. The School Board claims lack of funding for basic programs as the need for an increase in the parcel tax; then claims the need is for new programs; then claims the need is to save music and art programs…Sounds to me like the School Board isn’t quite clear on what it wants the money for. It just knows it wants more money. Don’t we all. The only thing is, its our money.

    5. Why are we closing Valley Oak, at the same time we are building a new elementary school in South Davis? Could it be there is only so much funding for 9 elementary schools, so one was closed to make way for the other? Could that be because we are paying ridiculous amounts of money for administrative salaries – including for one Superintendent that will be doing nothing – while letting our teachers suffer the consequences of inadequate salaries?

    6. How about if the School Board gets its fiscal house in order before we taxpayers shell out any more money that is just going to go down the rat hole into oblivion? I mean really, paying a superintendent $240,000 a year to not work; forcing teachers to pay a third of their salary for medical insurance; building a new school while closing another; failing to send a grant application for $4.5 million in on time; forgetting to set aside the necessary funding to build King High; and the list goes on.

    7. These same scare tactics have been used year after year (if you don’t vote for a tax increase your children will suffer, basic services will have to be cut) to extort money from the taxpayer. And what was the result? Bad fiscal management because we keep giving the School Board a blank check.

    I for one have had enough. I was willing to wait and see what the School Board gave as reasons to vote for Measure Q before I decided, to show they would be more fiscally responsible. All I have seen is the same old tactics used, with nothing to guarantee we won’t get more of the same. As far as I can see, its business as usual. The only way anything will change is if Valley Oak survives as a charter school, and citizens rise up and vote no on Measure Q. Then the School Board can come back with a better attitude, and maybe citizens will rethink things.

    Better yet, burn the midnight oil now, convince me the School Board is going to be more responsible because systems are in place to make sure, and maybe you will change my mind.

  9. There is no state mandate to reduce class size to 20 students at K-3. This is a local decision.

    Finding a new Superintendent was needed in order to be able to get the $4.5 million for Montgomery Elementary.

    Valley Oak was not closed while a new elementary school in South Davis was built. Korematsu is farther east Davis.

    Measure Q allows Davis to offer the programming that other neighboring Districts cannot. If families with young children don’t want the enrichment opportunities that Measure Q supports, then they can vote the measure down. But don’t come back later and complain about the disparity in education programming after all the cuts are made.

  10. There is no state mandate to reduce class size to 20 students at K-3. This is a local decision.

    Finding a new Superintendent was needed in order to be able to get the $4.5 million for Montgomery Elementary.

    Valley Oak was not closed while a new elementary school in South Davis was built. Korematsu is farther east Davis.

    Measure Q allows Davis to offer the programming that other neighboring Districts cannot. If families with young children don’t want the enrichment opportunities that Measure Q supports, then they can vote the measure down. But don’t come back later and complain about the disparity in education programming after all the cuts are made.

  11. There is no state mandate to reduce class size to 20 students at K-3. This is a local decision.

    Finding a new Superintendent was needed in order to be able to get the $4.5 million for Montgomery Elementary.

    Valley Oak was not closed while a new elementary school in South Davis was built. Korematsu is farther east Davis.

    Measure Q allows Davis to offer the programming that other neighboring Districts cannot. If families with young children don’t want the enrichment opportunities that Measure Q supports, then they can vote the measure down. But don’t come back later and complain about the disparity in education programming after all the cuts are made.

  12. There is no state mandate to reduce class size to 20 students at K-3. This is a local decision.

    Finding a new Superintendent was needed in order to be able to get the $4.5 million for Montgomery Elementary.

    Valley Oak was not closed while a new elementary school in South Davis was built. Korematsu is farther east Davis.

    Measure Q allows Davis to offer the programming that other neighboring Districts cannot. If families with young children don’t want the enrichment opportunities that Measure Q supports, then they can vote the measure down. But don’t come back later and complain about the disparity in education programming after all the cuts are made.

  13. From the Ca State PTA:
    “Class Size Reduction in California is not a mandate: it does not require school districts to reduce class size. Rather, it uses financial incentives to encourage them to do so.
    The CSR Program is a voluntary incentive program. The state provides per pupil funding for each child in grades K-3 who receives instruction in a class of 20 or fewer pupils. Although classes may occasionally exceed 20 pupils without penalty, in order to receive funding, each class must maintain an average of 20.4 pupils or less.”

    IIRC, the financial incentives are pretty substantial. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe that allowing class sizes to increase would result in a loss of funds to the schools.

  14. From the Ca State PTA:
    “Class Size Reduction in California is not a mandate: it does not require school districts to reduce class size. Rather, it uses financial incentives to encourage them to do so.
    The CSR Program is a voluntary incentive program. The state provides per pupil funding for each child in grades K-3 who receives instruction in a class of 20 or fewer pupils. Although classes may occasionally exceed 20 pupils without penalty, in order to receive funding, each class must maintain an average of 20.4 pupils or less.”

    IIRC, the financial incentives are pretty substantial. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe that allowing class sizes to increase would result in a loss of funds to the schools.

  15. From the Ca State PTA:
    “Class Size Reduction in California is not a mandate: it does not require school districts to reduce class size. Rather, it uses financial incentives to encourage them to do so.
    The CSR Program is a voluntary incentive program. The state provides per pupil funding for each child in grades K-3 who receives instruction in a class of 20 or fewer pupils. Although classes may occasionally exceed 20 pupils without penalty, in order to receive funding, each class must maintain an average of 20.4 pupils or less.”

    IIRC, the financial incentives are pretty substantial. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe that allowing class sizes to increase would result in a loss of funds to the schools.

  16. From the Ca State PTA:
    “Class Size Reduction in California is not a mandate: it does not require school districts to reduce class size. Rather, it uses financial incentives to encourage them to do so.
    The CSR Program is a voluntary incentive program. The state provides per pupil funding for each child in grades K-3 who receives instruction in a class of 20 or fewer pupils. Although classes may occasionally exceed 20 pupils without penalty, in order to receive funding, each class must maintain an average of 20.4 pupils or less.”

    IIRC, the financial incentives are pretty substantial. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe that allowing class sizes to increase would result in a loss of funds to the schools.

  17. It is my understanding that allowing primary ed classrooms to exceed twenty students triggers a loss of state funds. At the same time, state funds do not fully support primary classes of only 20 students. Other districts that do not have parcel taxes are then forced to used general funds to make up the difference or lose state funding.

    While I too am upset about the fiscal irresponsibility of our school district, I feel that it would be very irresponsible of us to reject Measure Q. School finance is very complicated, and I do not pretend to understand it all; but I do know that there are different pots of monies that can only be used to fund certain things. For instance, the money that we did or did not get over Marguerite Montgomery and King High was all building funds– which can not be used for programs nor can program money be used for building projects.

    If you have never been in a district that does not tax itself to pay for school programs as Davis does, then please go visit one or talk to your friends because they look very different than ours. Look at certain Bay Area cities where the difference in programs offered from one school to another comes down to how much money the PTA can raise to buy the computer labs, pay music and art teachers, pay reading and math specialists etc etc.

    A few weeks ago the administrator of this blog said it best– I am not quoting–when he said if you are angry with the school board have a protest– sit in or picket, but please do not take away from our children.

  18. It is my understanding that allowing primary ed classrooms to exceed twenty students triggers a loss of state funds. At the same time, state funds do not fully support primary classes of only 20 students. Other districts that do not have parcel taxes are then forced to used general funds to make up the difference or lose state funding.

    While I too am upset about the fiscal irresponsibility of our school district, I feel that it would be very irresponsible of us to reject Measure Q. School finance is very complicated, and I do not pretend to understand it all; but I do know that there are different pots of monies that can only be used to fund certain things. For instance, the money that we did or did not get over Marguerite Montgomery and King High was all building funds– which can not be used for programs nor can program money be used for building projects.

    If you have never been in a district that does not tax itself to pay for school programs as Davis does, then please go visit one or talk to your friends because they look very different than ours. Look at certain Bay Area cities where the difference in programs offered from one school to another comes down to how much money the PTA can raise to buy the computer labs, pay music and art teachers, pay reading and math specialists etc etc.

    A few weeks ago the administrator of this blog said it best– I am not quoting–when he said if you are angry with the school board have a protest– sit in or picket, but please do not take away from our children.

  19. It is my understanding that allowing primary ed classrooms to exceed twenty students triggers a loss of state funds. At the same time, state funds do not fully support primary classes of only 20 students. Other districts that do not have parcel taxes are then forced to used general funds to make up the difference or lose state funding.

    While I too am upset about the fiscal irresponsibility of our school district, I feel that it would be very irresponsible of us to reject Measure Q. School finance is very complicated, and I do not pretend to understand it all; but I do know that there are different pots of monies that can only be used to fund certain things. For instance, the money that we did or did not get over Marguerite Montgomery and King High was all building funds– which can not be used for programs nor can program money be used for building projects.

    If you have never been in a district that does not tax itself to pay for school programs as Davis does, then please go visit one or talk to your friends because they look very different than ours. Look at certain Bay Area cities where the difference in programs offered from one school to another comes down to how much money the PTA can raise to buy the computer labs, pay music and art teachers, pay reading and math specialists etc etc.

    A few weeks ago the administrator of this blog said it best– I am not quoting–when he said if you are angry with the school board have a protest– sit in or picket, but please do not take away from our children.

  20. It is my understanding that allowing primary ed classrooms to exceed twenty students triggers a loss of state funds. At the same time, state funds do not fully support primary classes of only 20 students. Other districts that do not have parcel taxes are then forced to used general funds to make up the difference or lose state funding.

    While I too am upset about the fiscal irresponsibility of our school district, I feel that it would be very irresponsible of us to reject Measure Q. School finance is very complicated, and I do not pretend to understand it all; but I do know that there are different pots of monies that can only be used to fund certain things. For instance, the money that we did or did not get over Marguerite Montgomery and King High was all building funds– which can not be used for programs nor can program money be used for building projects.

    If you have never been in a district that does not tax itself to pay for school programs as Davis does, then please go visit one or talk to your friends because they look very different than ours. Look at certain Bay Area cities where the difference in programs offered from one school to another comes down to how much money the PTA can raise to buy the computer labs, pay music and art teachers, pay reading and math specialists etc etc.

    A few weeks ago the administrator of this blog said it best– I am not quoting–when he said if you are angry with the school board have a protest– sit in or picket, but please do not take away from our children.

  21. From a simply selfish perspective, the value of living in Davis, and the value of property we own, is tied to things such as quality schools, parks, and the like.
    Investing in the schools, in addition to the very real needs of our kids, has a very real impact in the value of our homes.
    So voting for any school or park funds is a no-brainer, since the yearly cost is vastly less than the subsequent increased value to our wallets in house values.
    People move here for the schools, and that drives up our property values.

  22. From a simply selfish perspective, the value of living in Davis, and the value of property we own, is tied to things such as quality schools, parks, and the like.
    Investing in the schools, in addition to the very real needs of our kids, has a very real impact in the value of our homes.
    So voting for any school or park funds is a no-brainer, since the yearly cost is vastly less than the subsequent increased value to our wallets in house values.
    People move here for the schools, and that drives up our property values.

  23. From a simply selfish perspective, the value of living in Davis, and the value of property we own, is tied to things such as quality schools, parks, and the like.
    Investing in the schools, in addition to the very real needs of our kids, has a very real impact in the value of our homes.
    So voting for any school or park funds is a no-brainer, since the yearly cost is vastly less than the subsequent increased value to our wallets in house values.
    People move here for the schools, and that drives up our property values.