Commentary: War Brewing with the County on Peripheral Growth Can End with a Simple “No” Vote on Tuesday

One week ago today, I got a call on my cell from one of the County Supervisors forewarning me that the county general plan staff report was coming out that afternoon, that it included in it recommendations to create special study areas that included Oeste, Covell, and I-80. These study areas looked and smelled much more like development proposals than concepts for changing land use designations. In any case, I was warned that Davis would go berserk over this and that there would be recalls. Whatever one thinks of Supervisor Matt Rexroad, his assessment last Friday, was exactly right and then some.

This week has been chaotic ever since that point in time. The reaction to this proposal has been justifiably angry, although I stop short of my friend Former Mayor Bill Kopper and current Mayor Sue Greenwald’s call for recall, I remain very concerned about what these proposals will do to the city of Davis.

However, this is not set in stone yet. As Supervisor Rexroad pointed out in his blog,

“We have not even voted on it yet.”

The County Board of Supervisors will meet on Tuesday, July 17, 2007 starting around 9 am. This figures to be another very long day. However, everyone with concerns about this proposal and this process are strongly encouraged to come and voice those concerns.

My fear is that Davis’ County Supervisors are unsympathetic to the concerns about large peripheral developments on the borders of Davis. After all, they are bringing forth another version of Covell Village which was defeated by a 60-40 margin just a year and a half ago. And the Covell Village property is the SMALLEST of the proposals by the county. People are angry because they feel that their own elected supervisors do not respect their vote or their desires.

Supervisor Mike McGowan who represents West Sacramento (not Davis) was quoted in yesterday’s outstanding Sacramento Bee article as saying:

“We need to improve our revenue side so we can continue to provide the same level of services.”

This continues to be a poor argument.

County staff, as I pointed out last Saturday, dispelled this myth:

“On the residential side, staff is recommending against the addition of 2,100 residences within the unincorporated area near the northwest quadrant of Davis, as these units are not likely to have fiscal benefits for the county that would justify the growth given concerns regarding inconsistency with long-standing growth policies, provision of infrastructure and services, and effects on the city/county pass-through agreement.”

The county is due roughly $72 million in the pass-through agreement over the course of the next 18 years. Developments may yield some in the way of one-time development fees, but the key phrase there is “one-time.” It is not a consistent stream of money. As the county of Sacramento and the city of Fresno have both learned you cannot develop yourself into prosperity, even if you create development policies that rely on repeated one-time development fees as the main source of revenues.

Moreover if Supervisor McGowan is so concerned about county revenues, perhaps he ought to propose massive new developments on the periphery of West Sacramento, I understand they like sprawl there.

The Bee yesterday quotes Supervisor Mariko Yamada saying,

“I would like everyone to take a deep breath. Calm down… There will be no decisions on specific projects that will be entertained in terms of action on Tuesday.”

But as Tsakopoulos understands, Yamada’s statement is simply untrue.

“If they decide not to study it, it’s all over.”

That is exactly right. Right now, as far as I can tell there are two firm no votes against the study areas. That means a no vote by either Supervisor Yamada or Supervisor Thomson can kill the plan. One must ask why certain Republican Supervisors who do not live here are more protective of Davis’ borders than Davis’ own supervisors.

At Tuesday’s Davis City Council meeting, the council unanimously supported taking a strong stance against these proposals. City staff drafted a letter by all five council members that will strongly oppose any plans by the county to study growth on Davis’ borders.

Despite the claims of one of Davis’ supervisors, the prognosis of this is clear–if the county votes against studying these three areas on Davis’ periphery, the proposal dies. If however, the county votes to study these three areas on Davis’ periphery, the fighting and war of words that we have seen this past week is just the beginning.

The Vanguard strongly urges Supervisors Yamada and Thomson to leave growth on Davis’ city edges to Davis. Moreover, all Davis residents with concerns about this process should go to the meeting on July 17, 2007 to voice those concerns.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

Author

  • David Greenwald

    Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Categories:

Land Use/Open Space

176 comments

  1. What is needed, and fast, is a ballot initiative in Yolo Co. that would recognize each city, town and hamlet’s right to a “zone of control”, outside pass through “agreements”. The idea being that any county development would be veto-able by the local community (those most impacted by the close development) voters in a “J”- like style.
    Otherwise this Ramos/Buzz mace ranch development by extortion will become the rule for us here in Davis.
    I think the voters county wide would pass such an initiative, easy (better than 60-40)

  2. What is needed, and fast, is a ballot initiative in Yolo Co. that would recognize each city, town and hamlet’s right to a “zone of control”, outside pass through “agreements”. The idea being that any county development would be veto-able by the local community (those most impacted by the close development) voters in a “J”- like style.
    Otherwise this Ramos/Buzz mace ranch development by extortion will become the rule for us here in Davis.
    I think the voters county wide would pass such an initiative, easy (better than 60-40)

  3. What is needed, and fast, is a ballot initiative in Yolo Co. that would recognize each city, town and hamlet’s right to a “zone of control”, outside pass through “agreements”. The idea being that any county development would be veto-able by the local community (those most impacted by the close development) voters in a “J”- like style.
    Otherwise this Ramos/Buzz mace ranch development by extortion will become the rule for us here in Davis.
    I think the voters county wide would pass such an initiative, easy (better than 60-40)

  4. What is needed, and fast, is a ballot initiative in Yolo Co. that would recognize each city, town and hamlet’s right to a “zone of control”, outside pass through “agreements”. The idea being that any county development would be veto-able by the local community (those most impacted by the close development) voters in a “J”- like style.
    Otherwise this Ramos/Buzz mace ranch development by extortion will become the rule for us here in Davis.
    I think the voters county wide would pass such an initiative, easy (better than 60-40)

  5. Davis, like that little boy in the novel by Gunter Grass, refuses to grow. I suggest the book as required reading to the cognoscenti of Davis. Life’s events compell the squealing little runt to grow, but he ends up a grotesque gnome of a man living out his life locked up in a sanitarium.

    Davis too needs to grow or it too will end up small, ugly and a bit bonkers. I write this as someone who is fond of Davis, who lived and worked here from 1987-92, graduated from UCD and has returned to settle down with my fiancee’, a Davis native. Despite my feeling that we are often a bit too proud of ourselves, I have to admit that we have a darn nice little town. I love Davis. I like being able to walk to Farmers’ Market and ride my bike to the Doctor’s office.

    I have a feeling many Davisites share my feelings. They like Davis the way it is. They don’t want it to change. The answer many feel is to not allow it to grow, or to severly limit its growth. Here we depart company.

    One of the many things I learned at UCD, having taken many life science classes, is that things that don’t grow or change are not doing so well. From my seasonal observances of Putah Creek I can tell you that they also get rather smelly.

    As someone who is again a resident of Davis after a hiatus of 15 years I can testify that Davis has changed in spite of its refusal to grow at a normal rate. It has become more car-dominated. It has more copy-cat beige stucco sub-divisions that are distinguisable from the next California town only by virtue of the name on the street signs and manhole covers. It has become more expensive. It has become more white and more wealthy.

    Some things have not changed. Its leaders are pitching the same fit they did 15 years ago before eventually being forced to allow the development of the Mace ranch. Look how that ended up.

    Being a “Tin Drum town” doesn’t just make us a side-show curiousity of a city, it impacts our residents. One of my Davis native fiancee’s siblings moved to Dixon to buy a home. One is doubled-up in an apartment with another family. The third managed to find a cheap rental house when her recent marriage made her over-income for her rent-restricted apartment – albeit with one with no air conditioning.

    But enough of why Davis should grow for its own good or the good of its residents. Davis should grow for the good of the County and the region, especially for the good of the poor and working class for whom our hearts bleed so.

    I’m a housing guy. I work for a small city in the region. Feel free to guess which one. No matter, I know a little bit about housing. There is this thing called the Regional Housing Needs Plan. Odd little inter-governmental agencies that mainly deal with transporation planning are mandated by the state to create these plans every 5-7 years. Our region’s planning agency is called SACOG (no its not a new treatment for acid reflux or depression).

    These housing needs plans tell each jurisdiction in the region how much affordable housing each needs to plan to build in the coming years. If your city, town or county doesn’t come up with a General Plan that demonstrates that you are planning for this housing (to the satisfaction of the state) then you get a not-so-nice letter from the state to your CEO and governing board and several nice sources of state funds become off-limits. Its also rather embarrasing to us city planners.

    One curious thing about this plan is that a town’s future “need” for affordable housing is largely determined by its growth in recent years. A town that does not grow (Davis) ends up not “needing” to produce a lot of affordable housing. A town whose population has recently taken off (West Sacramento) is told that it “needs” to produce more affordable housing even though it may historically be a less wealthy community with an abundance of less than posh accomodations. Yes, the tail of growth wags the affordable housing dog.

    Oh, and before you take your pitchforks and torches to the next SACOG board meeting, its state law that dictates this bass-ackwards methodology. That would be the state law of un-intended long-term consequences.

    So by Davis refusing to grow, its not pulling its weight on overall regional growth and as a result, not pulling its weight on meeting the regional need for affordable housing. Shame on us.

    But that’s not all. There are parts of our region that face some fairly serious quality of life issues. These are issues that Yolo County has managed to avoid so far. Issues that it can avoid in perpetuity if it adheres to the wise philosophy of keeping growth concentrated in existing towns, limiting sprawl, and preserving agricultural and open space land uses as buffers between urban areas.

    But it can’t do it if Davis doesn’t pull its weight in terms of County population growth. Which is precisely what our Supervisors are not-so-subtly telling us we should do.

    So let’s build out north of Covell where it makes sense. Let’s do it in a way that creates vibrant unique neighborhoods. Refusing to grow will not preserve Davis’ quality of life any more than it did little Oskar’s. Growing in a way that makes sense and that meets the needs of our growing region will create new opportunities to expand, enhance, share and ultimately preserve our community’s cherished way of life.

    Sign me “Rob the Returned”

  6. Davis, like that little boy in the novel by Gunter Grass, refuses to grow. I suggest the book as required reading to the cognoscenti of Davis. Life’s events compell the squealing little runt to grow, but he ends up a grotesque gnome of a man living out his life locked up in a sanitarium.

    Davis too needs to grow or it too will end up small, ugly and a bit bonkers. I write this as someone who is fond of Davis, who lived and worked here from 1987-92, graduated from UCD and has returned to settle down with my fiancee’, a Davis native. Despite my feeling that we are often a bit too proud of ourselves, I have to admit that we have a darn nice little town. I love Davis. I like being able to walk to Farmers’ Market and ride my bike to the Doctor’s office.

    I have a feeling many Davisites share my feelings. They like Davis the way it is. They don’t want it to change. The answer many feel is to not allow it to grow, or to severly limit its growth. Here we depart company.

    One of the many things I learned at UCD, having taken many life science classes, is that things that don’t grow or change are not doing so well. From my seasonal observances of Putah Creek I can tell you that they also get rather smelly.

    As someone who is again a resident of Davis after a hiatus of 15 years I can testify that Davis has changed in spite of its refusal to grow at a normal rate. It has become more car-dominated. It has more copy-cat beige stucco sub-divisions that are distinguisable from the next California town only by virtue of the name on the street signs and manhole covers. It has become more expensive. It has become more white and more wealthy.

    Some things have not changed. Its leaders are pitching the same fit they did 15 years ago before eventually being forced to allow the development of the Mace ranch. Look how that ended up.

    Being a “Tin Drum town” doesn’t just make us a side-show curiousity of a city, it impacts our residents. One of my Davis native fiancee’s siblings moved to Dixon to buy a home. One is doubled-up in an apartment with another family. The third managed to find a cheap rental house when her recent marriage made her over-income for her rent-restricted apartment – albeit with one with no air conditioning.

    But enough of why Davis should grow for its own good or the good of its residents. Davis should grow for the good of the County and the region, especially for the good of the poor and working class for whom our hearts bleed so.

    I’m a housing guy. I work for a small city in the region. Feel free to guess which one. No matter, I know a little bit about housing. There is this thing called the Regional Housing Needs Plan. Odd little inter-governmental agencies that mainly deal with transporation planning are mandated by the state to create these plans every 5-7 years. Our region’s planning agency is called SACOG (no its not a new treatment for acid reflux or depression).

    These housing needs plans tell each jurisdiction in the region how much affordable housing each needs to plan to build in the coming years. If your city, town or county doesn’t come up with a General Plan that demonstrates that you are planning for this housing (to the satisfaction of the state) then you get a not-so-nice letter from the state to your CEO and governing board and several nice sources of state funds become off-limits. Its also rather embarrasing to us city planners.

    One curious thing about this plan is that a town’s future “need” for affordable housing is largely determined by its growth in recent years. A town that does not grow (Davis) ends up not “needing” to produce a lot of affordable housing. A town whose population has recently taken off (West Sacramento) is told that it “needs” to produce more affordable housing even though it may historically be a less wealthy community with an abundance of less than posh accomodations. Yes, the tail of growth wags the affordable housing dog.

    Oh, and before you take your pitchforks and torches to the next SACOG board meeting, its state law that dictates this bass-ackwards methodology. That would be the state law of un-intended long-term consequences.

    So by Davis refusing to grow, its not pulling its weight on overall regional growth and as a result, not pulling its weight on meeting the regional need for affordable housing. Shame on us.

    But that’s not all. There are parts of our region that face some fairly serious quality of life issues. These are issues that Yolo County has managed to avoid so far. Issues that it can avoid in perpetuity if it adheres to the wise philosophy of keeping growth concentrated in existing towns, limiting sprawl, and preserving agricultural and open space land uses as buffers between urban areas.

    But it can’t do it if Davis doesn’t pull its weight in terms of County population growth. Which is precisely what our Supervisors are not-so-subtly telling us we should do.

    So let’s build out north of Covell where it makes sense. Let’s do it in a way that creates vibrant unique neighborhoods. Refusing to grow will not preserve Davis’ quality of life any more than it did little Oskar’s. Growing in a way that makes sense and that meets the needs of our growing region will create new opportunities to expand, enhance, share and ultimately preserve our community’s cherished way of life.

    Sign me “Rob the Returned”

  7. Davis, like that little boy in the novel by Gunter Grass, refuses to grow. I suggest the book as required reading to the cognoscenti of Davis. Life’s events compell the squealing little runt to grow, but he ends up a grotesque gnome of a man living out his life locked up in a sanitarium.

    Davis too needs to grow or it too will end up small, ugly and a bit bonkers. I write this as someone who is fond of Davis, who lived and worked here from 1987-92, graduated from UCD and has returned to settle down with my fiancee’, a Davis native. Despite my feeling that we are often a bit too proud of ourselves, I have to admit that we have a darn nice little town. I love Davis. I like being able to walk to Farmers’ Market and ride my bike to the Doctor’s office.

    I have a feeling many Davisites share my feelings. They like Davis the way it is. They don’t want it to change. The answer many feel is to not allow it to grow, or to severly limit its growth. Here we depart company.

    One of the many things I learned at UCD, having taken many life science classes, is that things that don’t grow or change are not doing so well. From my seasonal observances of Putah Creek I can tell you that they also get rather smelly.

    As someone who is again a resident of Davis after a hiatus of 15 years I can testify that Davis has changed in spite of its refusal to grow at a normal rate. It has become more car-dominated. It has more copy-cat beige stucco sub-divisions that are distinguisable from the next California town only by virtue of the name on the street signs and manhole covers. It has become more expensive. It has become more white and more wealthy.

    Some things have not changed. Its leaders are pitching the same fit they did 15 years ago before eventually being forced to allow the development of the Mace ranch. Look how that ended up.

    Being a “Tin Drum town” doesn’t just make us a side-show curiousity of a city, it impacts our residents. One of my Davis native fiancee’s siblings moved to Dixon to buy a home. One is doubled-up in an apartment with another family. The third managed to find a cheap rental house when her recent marriage made her over-income for her rent-restricted apartment – albeit with one with no air conditioning.

    But enough of why Davis should grow for its own good or the good of its residents. Davis should grow for the good of the County and the region, especially for the good of the poor and working class for whom our hearts bleed so.

    I’m a housing guy. I work for a small city in the region. Feel free to guess which one. No matter, I know a little bit about housing. There is this thing called the Regional Housing Needs Plan. Odd little inter-governmental agencies that mainly deal with transporation planning are mandated by the state to create these plans every 5-7 years. Our region’s planning agency is called SACOG (no its not a new treatment for acid reflux or depression).

    These housing needs plans tell each jurisdiction in the region how much affordable housing each needs to plan to build in the coming years. If your city, town or county doesn’t come up with a General Plan that demonstrates that you are planning for this housing (to the satisfaction of the state) then you get a not-so-nice letter from the state to your CEO and governing board and several nice sources of state funds become off-limits. Its also rather embarrasing to us city planners.

    One curious thing about this plan is that a town’s future “need” for affordable housing is largely determined by its growth in recent years. A town that does not grow (Davis) ends up not “needing” to produce a lot of affordable housing. A town whose population has recently taken off (West Sacramento) is told that it “needs” to produce more affordable housing even though it may historically be a less wealthy community with an abundance of less than posh accomodations. Yes, the tail of growth wags the affordable housing dog.

    Oh, and before you take your pitchforks and torches to the next SACOG board meeting, its state law that dictates this bass-ackwards methodology. That would be the state law of un-intended long-term consequences.

    So by Davis refusing to grow, its not pulling its weight on overall regional growth and as a result, not pulling its weight on meeting the regional need for affordable housing. Shame on us.

    But that’s not all. There are parts of our region that face some fairly serious quality of life issues. These are issues that Yolo County has managed to avoid so far. Issues that it can avoid in perpetuity if it adheres to the wise philosophy of keeping growth concentrated in existing towns, limiting sprawl, and preserving agricultural and open space land uses as buffers between urban areas.

    But it can’t do it if Davis doesn’t pull its weight in terms of County population growth. Which is precisely what our Supervisors are not-so-subtly telling us we should do.

    So let’s build out north of Covell where it makes sense. Let’s do it in a way that creates vibrant unique neighborhoods. Refusing to grow will not preserve Davis’ quality of life any more than it did little Oskar’s. Growing in a way that makes sense and that meets the needs of our growing region will create new opportunities to expand, enhance, share and ultimately preserve our community’s cherished way of life.

    Sign me “Rob the Returned”

  8. Davis, like that little boy in the novel by Gunter Grass, refuses to grow. I suggest the book as required reading to the cognoscenti of Davis. Life’s events compell the squealing little runt to grow, but he ends up a grotesque gnome of a man living out his life locked up in a sanitarium.

    Davis too needs to grow or it too will end up small, ugly and a bit bonkers. I write this as someone who is fond of Davis, who lived and worked here from 1987-92, graduated from UCD and has returned to settle down with my fiancee’, a Davis native. Despite my feeling that we are often a bit too proud of ourselves, I have to admit that we have a darn nice little town. I love Davis. I like being able to walk to Farmers’ Market and ride my bike to the Doctor’s office.

    I have a feeling many Davisites share my feelings. They like Davis the way it is. They don’t want it to change. The answer many feel is to not allow it to grow, or to severly limit its growth. Here we depart company.

    One of the many things I learned at UCD, having taken many life science classes, is that things that don’t grow or change are not doing so well. From my seasonal observances of Putah Creek I can tell you that they also get rather smelly.

    As someone who is again a resident of Davis after a hiatus of 15 years I can testify that Davis has changed in spite of its refusal to grow at a normal rate. It has become more car-dominated. It has more copy-cat beige stucco sub-divisions that are distinguisable from the next California town only by virtue of the name on the street signs and manhole covers. It has become more expensive. It has become more white and more wealthy.

    Some things have not changed. Its leaders are pitching the same fit they did 15 years ago before eventually being forced to allow the development of the Mace ranch. Look how that ended up.

    Being a “Tin Drum town” doesn’t just make us a side-show curiousity of a city, it impacts our residents. One of my Davis native fiancee’s siblings moved to Dixon to buy a home. One is doubled-up in an apartment with another family. The third managed to find a cheap rental house when her recent marriage made her over-income for her rent-restricted apartment – albeit with one with no air conditioning.

    But enough of why Davis should grow for its own good or the good of its residents. Davis should grow for the good of the County and the region, especially for the good of the poor and working class for whom our hearts bleed so.

    I’m a housing guy. I work for a small city in the region. Feel free to guess which one. No matter, I know a little bit about housing. There is this thing called the Regional Housing Needs Plan. Odd little inter-governmental agencies that mainly deal with transporation planning are mandated by the state to create these plans every 5-7 years. Our region’s planning agency is called SACOG (no its not a new treatment for acid reflux or depression).

    These housing needs plans tell each jurisdiction in the region how much affordable housing each needs to plan to build in the coming years. If your city, town or county doesn’t come up with a General Plan that demonstrates that you are planning for this housing (to the satisfaction of the state) then you get a not-so-nice letter from the state to your CEO and governing board and several nice sources of state funds become off-limits. Its also rather embarrasing to us city planners.

    One curious thing about this plan is that a town’s future “need” for affordable housing is largely determined by its growth in recent years. A town that does not grow (Davis) ends up not “needing” to produce a lot of affordable housing. A town whose population has recently taken off (West Sacramento) is told that it “needs” to produce more affordable housing even though it may historically be a less wealthy community with an abundance of less than posh accomodations. Yes, the tail of growth wags the affordable housing dog.

    Oh, and before you take your pitchforks and torches to the next SACOG board meeting, its state law that dictates this bass-ackwards methodology. That would be the state law of un-intended long-term consequences.

    So by Davis refusing to grow, its not pulling its weight on overall regional growth and as a result, not pulling its weight on meeting the regional need for affordable housing. Shame on us.

    But that’s not all. There are parts of our region that face some fairly serious quality of life issues. These are issues that Yolo County has managed to avoid so far. Issues that it can avoid in perpetuity if it adheres to the wise philosophy of keeping growth concentrated in existing towns, limiting sprawl, and preserving agricultural and open space land uses as buffers between urban areas.

    But it can’t do it if Davis doesn’t pull its weight in terms of County population growth. Which is precisely what our Supervisors are not-so-subtly telling us we should do.

    So let’s build out north of Covell where it makes sense. Let’s do it in a way that creates vibrant unique neighborhoods. Refusing to grow will not preserve Davis’ quality of life any more than it did little Oskar’s. Growing in a way that makes sense and that meets the needs of our growing region will create new opportunities to expand, enhance, share and ultimately preserve our community’s cherished way of life.

    Sign me “Rob the Returned”

  9. There is a perception that Davis refuses to grow, in fact, that is actually a false statement. Look at the population growth since the early fifties when Davis was a town of barely a few thousand people and you quickly realize that even during the progressive era of the 1970s and 1980s, Davis grew very rapidly.

    So here are a couple of points that need to be made:

    1. Growth is inevitable, everyone knows it, the question is who should control how we grow–the city or the county. That is what THIS issue is about. The COUNTY has no right to determine how Davis grows.

    2. Growth is inevitable, that does not mean that every housing project should be approved. We need to control the manner in which we grow.

    3. Everyone talks about affordable housing and housing costs. Well guess what, you do not control housing costs by building more 600,000 dollar homes as Covell Village would have done.

    4. The affordable housing ordinance is a joke, it requires a small percentage of homes to affordable and by affordable that means limited equity, that does not help young families.

    5. What we need are a series of smaller and more dense developments. Put in slowly over time.

    6. The General Plan process needs to be revamped. You either end up with too much development or too little due to the nature of the system.

  10. There is a perception that Davis refuses to grow, in fact, that is actually a false statement. Look at the population growth since the early fifties when Davis was a town of barely a few thousand people and you quickly realize that even during the progressive era of the 1970s and 1980s, Davis grew very rapidly.

    So here are a couple of points that need to be made:

    1. Growth is inevitable, everyone knows it, the question is who should control how we grow–the city or the county. That is what THIS issue is about. The COUNTY has no right to determine how Davis grows.

    2. Growth is inevitable, that does not mean that every housing project should be approved. We need to control the manner in which we grow.

    3. Everyone talks about affordable housing and housing costs. Well guess what, you do not control housing costs by building more 600,000 dollar homes as Covell Village would have done.

    4. The affordable housing ordinance is a joke, it requires a small percentage of homes to affordable and by affordable that means limited equity, that does not help young families.

    5. What we need are a series of smaller and more dense developments. Put in slowly over time.

    6. The General Plan process needs to be revamped. You either end up with too much development or too little due to the nature of the system.

  11. There is a perception that Davis refuses to grow, in fact, that is actually a false statement. Look at the population growth since the early fifties when Davis was a town of barely a few thousand people and you quickly realize that even during the progressive era of the 1970s and 1980s, Davis grew very rapidly.

    So here are a couple of points that need to be made:

    1. Growth is inevitable, everyone knows it, the question is who should control how we grow–the city or the county. That is what THIS issue is about. The COUNTY has no right to determine how Davis grows.

    2. Growth is inevitable, that does not mean that every housing project should be approved. We need to control the manner in which we grow.

    3. Everyone talks about affordable housing and housing costs. Well guess what, you do not control housing costs by building more 600,000 dollar homes as Covell Village would have done.

    4. The affordable housing ordinance is a joke, it requires a small percentage of homes to affordable and by affordable that means limited equity, that does not help young families.

    5. What we need are a series of smaller and more dense developments. Put in slowly over time.

    6. The General Plan process needs to be revamped. You either end up with too much development or too little due to the nature of the system.

  12. There is a perception that Davis refuses to grow, in fact, that is actually a false statement. Look at the population growth since the early fifties when Davis was a town of barely a few thousand people and you quickly realize that even during the progressive era of the 1970s and 1980s, Davis grew very rapidly.

    So here are a couple of points that need to be made:

    1. Growth is inevitable, everyone knows it, the question is who should control how we grow–the city or the county. That is what THIS issue is about. The COUNTY has no right to determine how Davis grows.

    2. Growth is inevitable, that does not mean that every housing project should be approved. We need to control the manner in which we grow.

    3. Everyone talks about affordable housing and housing costs. Well guess what, you do not control housing costs by building more 600,000 dollar homes as Covell Village would have done.

    4. The affordable housing ordinance is a joke, it requires a small percentage of homes to affordable and by affordable that means limited equity, that does not help young families.

    5. What we need are a series of smaller and more dense developments. Put in slowly over time.

    6. The General Plan process needs to be revamped. You either end up with too much development or too little due to the nature of the system.

  13. Rob the returned… The issue at hand is whether the citizens of Davis should be able to listen to your well-presented point of view and then DECIDE For THEMSELVES how and when they will expand their city without threats to the pass-through agreement and other not very subtle County pressure/scare tactics).

  14. Rob the returned… The issue at hand is whether the citizens of Davis should be able to listen to your well-presented point of view and then DECIDE For THEMSELVES how and when they will expand their city without threats to the pass-through agreement and other not very subtle County pressure/scare tactics).

  15. Rob the returned… The issue at hand is whether the citizens of Davis should be able to listen to your well-presented point of view and then DECIDE For THEMSELVES how and when they will expand their city without threats to the pass-through agreement and other not very subtle County pressure/scare tactics).