Midday Brief Discussion Items

I was looking up some stuff yesterday and I happened across on of Matt Rexroad’s recent blog entries:

Today I was with my family cruising along I-80 headed for Thanksgiving festivities. We were just east of Vacaville when a California Highway Patrol Officer was on the side of the road hitting vehicles with the new radar gun.

I am fully in favor of the new equipment but think it is eventually going to cause some kind of an accident. I look up and see someone pointing some kind of a gun at me from that distance and my first reaction is to take cover and return fire.

My reaction was: are you kidding me? This guy is a Supervisor-elect? I wasn’t there and didn’t see the “pose” the Highway Patrol Officer was taking with his radar gun. But good lord, as an elected official you should not be joking or thinking about “returning fire” on a Highway Patrol Officer, it is utterly irresponsible. I’m certain the Highway Patrol office is not going to be happy about reading this. Especially to write it on a public blog, that’s just unbelievable.

Dunning’s column on Friday quotes from one of our own readers, Deb Westergaard’s letter to the editor. Deb is outraged that the council is suing Dixon over traffic concerns after the council put a huge Target project on the ballot that will also, amazingly enough, produce traffic concerns and add significantly and unavoidably to pollution. One small nit to pick, Dunning writes, “you see, in exchange for Davis-generated pollution, we get sales tax dollars, but we get nothing in exchange for Dixon-generated pollution unless we sue.” I like the cynical tone there and Dunning is partially right, but in fairness to the city, they are not suing for funding but rather for mitigating traffic problems. Nevertheless they are both right—the City Council has a lot of explaining to do on this one.

Finally, Tim Wallace, a deputy DA for Yolo County, writes a letter to the editor yesterday discussing the proposed rezoning of Westlake shopping center. As a neighbor of that shopping center, I was very saddened to see the demise of Rays and then Food Faire. It provided a convenient place to get a few last minute groceries. It should be a priority of the City to get a new food establishment into that site. Sadly, they are going to rezone it and move away from the local grocery store. The belief is that no local grocery store can make it in these locations which may or may not be right.

However, Wallace’s main concern is the emergence of a “problem business.” “Anything that is primarily a liquor store in that location undoubtedly will become a magnet for crime.” Take off your DA’s hat for a few minutes, good lord Mr. Wallace. We certainly do not want to attract those type of people to Westlake when there is a perfectly good Circle K two blocks away on Lake Blvd. Perhaps we’d be better off going to a dry city, that way we can avoid crime altogether.

It brings to mind an email acquired through a public records search from Bob Glynn. Glynn was one of the main people who spearheaded the drive against the Human Relations Commission. His main problem was their support for a resolution to withdraw US troops from Iraq in December of 2005. A resolution introduced to council by Stephen Souza and passed by a 4-0 vote with Don Saylor abstaining (and this was of course all the HRC’s fault). In any case, on June 26, 2006, Glynn writes to council: “When you consider the Target proposal tonight I hope you keep in mind the fact that Target will probably draw more undesirable people to the area…”

When we want to decry elitism in this city, perhaps we ought to go back and look up the term “undesirable people.” So apparently, we want to bring in Target and liquor stores but worry about “undesirable people” and “problem business.” No one of course calls people on this stuff. I find this a lot more irritating though than a city council member upset that PG&E paid $11 million in an attempt to confuse the voters on the issues. But that’s just me.

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

Author

  • David Greenwald

    Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

Categories:

Board of Supervisors

48 comments

  1. I’m reminded of the video-taped public meetings for the moderate/low-income housing planned for Wildhorse where a neighbor was concerned about undesirable people moving into the neighborhood and asked for criminal background checks to be done on all families wanting to move in.

    Similar concerns were voiced during the public meetings to redraw the attendance boundaries when Harper Junior High opened up.

    I do understand the concern for finding a business appropriate to the neighborhood, but I’d be more concerned for the store being empty for any length of time. Blight = crime. Trader Joe’s or something like the Berkeley Bowl? If not a grocery store, then something youth oriented to avoid the late night hours? How about moving all the businesses from the south end of Olive Drive and then fix the problems with that area?

  2. I’m reminded of the video-taped public meetings for the moderate/low-income housing planned for Wildhorse where a neighbor was concerned about undesirable people moving into the neighborhood and asked for criminal background checks to be done on all families wanting to move in.

    Similar concerns were voiced during the public meetings to redraw the attendance boundaries when Harper Junior High opened up.

    I do understand the concern for finding a business appropriate to the neighborhood, but I’d be more concerned for the store being empty for any length of time. Blight = crime. Trader Joe’s or something like the Berkeley Bowl? If not a grocery store, then something youth oriented to avoid the late night hours? How about moving all the businesses from the south end of Olive Drive and then fix the problems with that area?

  3. I’m reminded of the video-taped public meetings for the moderate/low-income housing planned for Wildhorse where a neighbor was concerned about undesirable people moving into the neighborhood and asked for criminal background checks to be done on all families wanting to move in.

    Similar concerns were voiced during the public meetings to redraw the attendance boundaries when Harper Junior High opened up.

    I do understand the concern for finding a business appropriate to the neighborhood, but I’d be more concerned for the store being empty for any length of time. Blight = crime. Trader Joe’s or something like the Berkeley Bowl? If not a grocery store, then something youth oriented to avoid the late night hours? How about moving all the businesses from the south end of Olive Drive and then fix the problems with that area?

  4. I’m reminded of the video-taped public meetings for the moderate/low-income housing planned for Wildhorse where a neighbor was concerned about undesirable people moving into the neighborhood and asked for criminal background checks to be done on all families wanting to move in.

    Similar concerns were voiced during the public meetings to redraw the attendance boundaries when Harper Junior High opened up.

    I do understand the concern for finding a business appropriate to the neighborhood, but I’d be more concerned for the store being empty for any length of time. Blight = crime. Trader Joe’s or something like the Berkeley Bowl? If not a grocery store, then something youth oriented to avoid the late night hours? How about moving all the businesses from the south end of Olive Drive and then fix the problems with that area?

  5. it’s rediculous that they can’t get a grocery store west of 113. both food fair and ray’s ran understaffed, mediocre grocery stores that weren’t really geared to the neighborhood’s demographics at all (student + affluent boomers who moved there in the 80s). the council was wrong to replace IGA with the kitch emporium that’s now in university mall, and it would be wrong to replace the westlake spot with anything other than a grocery store.

    i understand the concerns about letting it sit vacant for too long, but it’s rediculous and wasteful to have to drive across town for basic necessities, or to dixon [!] for groceries.

  6. it’s rediculous that they can’t get a grocery store west of 113. both food fair and ray’s ran understaffed, mediocre grocery stores that weren’t really geared to the neighborhood’s demographics at all (student + affluent boomers who moved there in the 80s). the council was wrong to replace IGA with the kitch emporium that’s now in university mall, and it would be wrong to replace the westlake spot with anything other than a grocery store.

    i understand the concerns about letting it sit vacant for too long, but it’s rediculous and wasteful to have to drive across town for basic necessities, or to dixon [!] for groceries.

  7. it’s rediculous that they can’t get a grocery store west of 113. both food fair and ray’s ran understaffed, mediocre grocery stores that weren’t really geared to the neighborhood’s demographics at all (student + affluent boomers who moved there in the 80s). the council was wrong to replace IGA with the kitch emporium that’s now in university mall, and it would be wrong to replace the westlake spot with anything other than a grocery store.

    i understand the concerns about letting it sit vacant for too long, but it’s rediculous and wasteful to have to drive across town for basic necessities, or to dixon [!] for groceries.

  8. it’s rediculous that they can’t get a grocery store west of 113. both food fair and ray’s ran understaffed, mediocre grocery stores that weren’t really geared to the neighborhood’s demographics at all (student + affluent boomers who moved there in the 80s). the council was wrong to replace IGA with the kitch emporium that’s now in university mall, and it would be wrong to replace the westlake spot with anything other than a grocery store.

    i understand the concerns about letting it sit vacant for too long, but it’s rediculous and wasteful to have to drive across town for basic necessities, or to dixon [!] for groceries.

  9. “However, Wallace’s main concern is the emergence of a ‘problem business.’ ‘Anything that is primarily a liquor store in that location undoubtedly will become a magnet for crime.'”

    When I read this yesterday, I wondered if there is any good empirical evidence to back up his claim? I had no idea that he was a deputy DA.

    For most of my life in Davis, we never had any liquor stores in town. (Davis was a dry town from the mid-1910s to about 1980.) Out on Chiles Road, east of the then-city limits, was where one had to drive to buy spirits or wine. To the best of my knowledge, those liquor stores out there were never “crime magnets.” When Aggie Liquor opened up at the Lucky Shopping Center (where 49er Video now is), I never heard that it was a “crime magnet.”

    So I am left to wonder: do liquor stores automatically lead to an upsurge in criminal behavior? Or is the Deputy DA just spouting off an unsubstantiated old wives tale?

  10. “However, Wallace’s main concern is the emergence of a ‘problem business.’ ‘Anything that is primarily a liquor store in that location undoubtedly will become a magnet for crime.'”

    When I read this yesterday, I wondered if there is any good empirical evidence to back up his claim? I had no idea that he was a deputy DA.

    For most of my life in Davis, we never had any liquor stores in town. (Davis was a dry town from the mid-1910s to about 1980.) Out on Chiles Road, east of the then-city limits, was where one had to drive to buy spirits or wine. To the best of my knowledge, those liquor stores out there were never “crime magnets.” When Aggie Liquor opened up at the Lucky Shopping Center (where 49er Video now is), I never heard that it was a “crime magnet.”

    So I am left to wonder: do liquor stores automatically lead to an upsurge in criminal behavior? Or is the Deputy DA just spouting off an unsubstantiated old wives tale?

  11. “However, Wallace’s main concern is the emergence of a ‘problem business.’ ‘Anything that is primarily a liquor store in that location undoubtedly will become a magnet for crime.'”

    When I read this yesterday, I wondered if there is any good empirical evidence to back up his claim? I had no idea that he was a deputy DA.

    For most of my life in Davis, we never had any liquor stores in town. (Davis was a dry town from the mid-1910s to about 1980.) Out on Chiles Road, east of the then-city limits, was where one had to drive to buy spirits or wine. To the best of my knowledge, those liquor stores out there were never “crime magnets.” When Aggie Liquor opened up at the Lucky Shopping Center (where 49er Video now is), I never heard that it was a “crime magnet.”

    So I am left to wonder: do liquor stores automatically lead to an upsurge in criminal behavior? Or is the Deputy DA just spouting off an unsubstantiated old wives tale?

  12. “However, Wallace’s main concern is the emergence of a ‘problem business.’ ‘Anything that is primarily a liquor store in that location undoubtedly will become a magnet for crime.'”

    When I read this yesterday, I wondered if there is any good empirical evidence to back up his claim? I had no idea that he was a deputy DA.

    For most of my life in Davis, we never had any liquor stores in town. (Davis was a dry town from the mid-1910s to about 1980.) Out on Chiles Road, east of the then-city limits, was where one had to drive to buy spirits or wine. To the best of my knowledge, those liquor stores out there were never “crime magnets.” When Aggie Liquor opened up at the Lucky Shopping Center (where 49er Video now is), I never heard that it was a “crime magnet.”

    So I am left to wonder: do liquor stores automatically lead to an upsurge in criminal behavior? Or is the Deputy DA just spouting off an unsubstantiated old wives tale?

  13. Wow, very interesting, I knew that Davis was dry for awhile, but I did not realize until 1980.

    I also wonder about what evidence there, especially when as I wrote, you have a Circle K two blocks away. I mean, that’s certainly going to attract similar people to a liquor store, I would think. I just don’t see the difference.

  14. Wow, very interesting, I knew that Davis was dry for awhile, but I did not realize until 1980.

    I also wonder about what evidence there, especially when as I wrote, you have a Circle K two blocks away. I mean, that’s certainly going to attract similar people to a liquor store, I would think. I just don’t see the difference.

  15. Wow, very interesting, I knew that Davis was dry for awhile, but I did not realize until 1980.

    I also wonder about what evidence there, especially when as I wrote, you have a Circle K two blocks away. I mean, that’s certainly going to attract similar people to a liquor store, I would think. I just don’t see the difference.

  16. Wow, very interesting, I knew that Davis was dry for awhile, but I did not realize until 1980.

    I also wonder about what evidence there, especially when as I wrote, you have a Circle K two blocks away. I mean, that’s certainly going to attract similar people to a liquor store, I would think. I just don’t see the difference.

  17. Alright I learn new stuff every day on this site. So I talked to the authority on Davis history and was informed that Davis was not dry in the classical sense that alcohol was prohibited. It was dry in the sense that you had to go outside city limits to purchase liquor in a store, there were some bars however that served liquor.

    The state law of 1911 prohibited certain alcohol sales within a given distance from the UC campus. And that was not changed until 1979. So no liquor in stores or grocery stores, but bars could serve it.

  18. Alright I learn new stuff every day on this site. So I talked to the authority on Davis history and was informed that Davis was not dry in the classical sense that alcohol was prohibited. It was dry in the sense that you had to go outside city limits to purchase liquor in a store, there were some bars however that served liquor.

    The state law of 1911 prohibited certain alcohol sales within a given distance from the UC campus. And that was not changed until 1979. So no liquor in stores or grocery stores, but bars could serve it.

  19. Alright I learn new stuff every day on this site. So I talked to the authority on Davis history and was informed that Davis was not dry in the classical sense that alcohol was prohibited. It was dry in the sense that you had to go outside city limits to purchase liquor in a store, there were some bars however that served liquor.

    The state law of 1911 prohibited certain alcohol sales within a given distance from the UC campus. And that was not changed until 1979. So no liquor in stores or grocery stores, but bars could serve it.

  20. Alright I learn new stuff every day on this site. So I talked to the authority on Davis history and was informed that Davis was not dry in the classical sense that alcohol was prohibited. It was dry in the sense that you had to go outside city limits to purchase liquor in a store, there were some bars however that served liquor.

    The state law of 1911 prohibited certain alcohol sales within a given distance from the UC campus. And that was not changed until 1979. So no liquor in stores or grocery stores, but bars could serve it.

  21. One argument that I heard for allowing alcohol sales in town was the fear that drunk college students getting in their cars to do the 3-mile alcohol run to the two liquor stores right across from each other on Chiles Road or to Frenchie’s Liquor in Woodland was too dangerous.

    The ordinance was changed but the city allowed time for the edge of town businesses to make arrangements before the first liquor stores opened up in town.

    Can you imagine a childhood where you never saw liquor for sale in any store in town? 20,000 square foot grocery stores were big enough back then.

  22. One argument that I heard for allowing alcohol sales in town was the fear that drunk college students getting in their cars to do the 3-mile alcohol run to the two liquor stores right across from each other on Chiles Road or to Frenchie’s Liquor in Woodland was too dangerous.

    The ordinance was changed but the city allowed time for the edge of town businesses to make arrangements before the first liquor stores opened up in town.

    Can you imagine a childhood where you never saw liquor for sale in any store in town? 20,000 square foot grocery stores were big enough back then.

  23. One argument that I heard for allowing alcohol sales in town was the fear that drunk college students getting in their cars to do the 3-mile alcohol run to the two liquor stores right across from each other on Chiles Road or to Frenchie’s Liquor in Woodland was too dangerous.

    The ordinance was changed but the city allowed time for the edge of town businesses to make arrangements before the first liquor stores opened up in town.

    Can you imagine a childhood where you never saw liquor for sale in any store in town? 20,000 square foot grocery stores were big enough back then.

  24. One argument that I heard for allowing alcohol sales in town was the fear that drunk college students getting in their cars to do the 3-mile alcohol run to the two liquor stores right across from each other on Chiles Road or to Frenchie’s Liquor in Woodland was too dangerous.

    The ordinance was changed but the city allowed time for the edge of town businesses to make arrangements before the first liquor stores opened up in town.

    Can you imagine a childhood where you never saw liquor for sale in any store in town? 20,000 square foot grocery stores were big enough back then.

  25. “Can you imagine a childhood where you never saw liquor for sale in any store in town?”

    I can imagine it. I lived it. I recall very distinctly when I was about 10 years old and we were visiting family in Palo Alto — also a college town, but not a dry one — when my mom and aunt took me to a grocery store and to my great shock and surprise there were bottles of booze for sale in the supermarket. I couldn’t believe it. I’d never seen anything like it.

    “20,000 square foot grocery stores were big enough back then.”

    I don’t know how big the State Market on 2nd Street was. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was about 800 square feet. Those were the days, though, when markets didn’t sell dairy products…. For milk and cheese and yogurt and so on, we had to order them from the Crystal Dairy, which was located right by the train depot at Second and G…. I remember the excitement of my brother, sister and I running to the front door on the mornings of dairy deliveries, each of us wanting to know what mom had ordered.

    —-

    By the way, Doug, was the expert you spoke with Jon Lofland? Along with Joann Leach Larkey, Jon is perhaps the best authority today on the history of Davis.

    —-

    One interesting historical sidenote on the banning of liquor and wine sales in Davis: before the University Farm came here, the principal business in the village of Davisville was the hotel and bar business. The railroad of course created this town (literally), and the depot supplied overnight travellers who wanted a bed to sleep in and some booze to drink.

    No group in town was more enthusiastic about bringing the University Farm to Davisville than were the barkeepers and hoteliers. They saw college students as new customers; and they expected that the University would increase train traffic to Davisville.

    However, just after the first students showed up, the Ladies Christian Temperance Union began banging the drums to make Davis (and all college towns) dry. (And back then, dry meant no alcohol at all, I believe.) The Temperance Union was successful in getting that state law passed, due largely to the argument that students would be too tempted to drink and not study if alcohol was available everywhere.

    So the irony was that the very people who pushed hardest for the University to come here were the victims of their own success.

  26. “Can you imagine a childhood where you never saw liquor for sale in any store in town?”

    I can imagine it. I lived it. I recall very distinctly when I was about 10 years old and we were visiting family in Palo Alto — also a college town, but not a dry one — when my mom and aunt took me to a grocery store and to my great shock and surprise there were bottles of booze for sale in the supermarket. I couldn’t believe it. I’d never seen anything like it.

    “20,000 square foot grocery stores were big enough back then.”

    I don’t know how big the State Market on 2nd Street was. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was about 800 square feet. Those were the days, though, when markets didn’t sell dairy products…. For milk and cheese and yogurt and so on, we had to order them from the Crystal Dairy, which was located right by the train depot at Second and G…. I remember the excitement of my brother, sister and I running to the front door on the mornings of dairy deliveries, each of us wanting to know what mom had ordered.

    —-

    By the way, Doug, was the expert you spoke with Jon Lofland? Along with Joann Leach Larkey, Jon is perhaps the best authority today on the history of Davis.

    —-

    One interesting historical sidenote on the banning of liquor and wine sales in Davis: before the University Farm came here, the principal business in the village of Davisville was the hotel and bar business. The railroad of course created this town (literally), and the depot supplied overnight travellers who wanted a bed to sleep in and some booze to drink.

    No group in town was more enthusiastic about bringing the University Farm to Davisville than were the barkeepers and hoteliers. They saw college students as new customers; and they expected that the University would increase train traffic to Davisville.

    However, just after the first students showed up, the Ladies Christian Temperance Union began banging the drums to make Davis (and all college towns) dry. (And back then, dry meant no alcohol at all, I believe.) The Temperance Union was successful in getting that state law passed, due largely to the argument that students would be too tempted to drink and not study if alcohol was available everywhere.

    So the irony was that the very people who pushed hardest for the University to come here were the victims of their own success.

  27. “Can you imagine a childhood where you never saw liquor for sale in any store in town?”

    I can imagine it. I lived it. I recall very distinctly when I was about 10 years old and we were visiting family in Palo Alto — also a college town, but not a dry one — when my mom and aunt took me to a grocery store and to my great shock and surprise there were bottles of booze for sale in the supermarket. I couldn’t believe it. I’d never seen anything like it.

    “20,000 square foot grocery stores were big enough back then.”

    I don’t know how big the State Market on 2nd Street was. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was about 800 square feet. Those were the days, though, when markets didn’t sell dairy products…. For milk and cheese and yogurt and so on, we had to order them from the Crystal Dairy, which was located right by the train depot at Second and G…. I remember the excitement of my brother, sister and I running to the front door on the mornings of dairy deliveries, each of us wanting to know what mom had ordered.

    —-

    By the way, Doug, was the expert you spoke with Jon Lofland? Along with Joann Leach Larkey, Jon is perhaps the best authority today on the history of Davis.

    —-

    One interesting historical sidenote on the banning of liquor and wine sales in Davis: before the University Farm came here, the principal business in the village of Davisville was the hotel and bar business. The railroad of course created this town (literally), and the depot supplied overnight travellers who wanted a bed to sleep in and some booze to drink.

    No group in town was more enthusiastic about bringing the University Farm to Davisville than were the barkeepers and hoteliers. They saw college students as new customers; and they expected that the University would increase train traffic to Davisville.

    However, just after the first students showed up, the Ladies Christian Temperance Union began banging the drums to make Davis (and all college towns) dry. (And back then, dry meant no alcohol at all, I believe.) The Temperance Union was successful in getting that state law passed, due largely to the argument that students would be too tempted to drink and not study if alcohol was available everywhere.

    So the irony was that the very people who pushed hardest for the University to come here were the victims of their own success.

  28. “Can you imagine a childhood where you never saw liquor for sale in any store in town?”

    I can imagine it. I lived it. I recall very distinctly when I was about 10 years old and we were visiting family in Palo Alto — also a college town, but not a dry one — when my mom and aunt took me to a grocery store and to my great shock and surprise there were bottles of booze for sale in the supermarket. I couldn’t believe it. I’d never seen anything like it.

    “20,000 square foot grocery stores were big enough back then.”

    I don’t know how big the State Market on 2nd Street was. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was about 800 square feet. Those were the days, though, when markets didn’t sell dairy products…. For milk and cheese and yogurt and so on, we had to order them from the Crystal Dairy, which was located right by the train depot at Second and G…. I remember the excitement of my brother, sister and I running to the front door on the mornings of dairy deliveries, each of us wanting to know what mom had ordered.

    —-

    By the way, Doug, was the expert you spoke with Jon Lofland? Along with Joann Leach Larkey, Jon is perhaps the best authority today on the history of Davis.

    —-

    One interesting historical sidenote on the banning of liquor and wine sales in Davis: before the University Farm came here, the principal business in the village of Davisville was the hotel and bar business. The railroad of course created this town (literally), and the depot supplied overnight travellers who wanted a bed to sleep in and some booze to drink.

    No group in town was more enthusiastic about bringing the University Farm to Davisville than were the barkeepers and hoteliers. They saw college students as new customers; and they expected that the University would increase train traffic to Davisville.

    However, just after the first students showed up, the Ladies Christian Temperance Union began banging the drums to make Davis (and all college towns) dry. (And back then, dry meant no alcohol at all, I believe.) The Temperance Union was successful in getting that state law passed, due largely to the argument that students would be too tempted to drink and not study if alcohol was available everywhere.

    So the irony was that the very people who pushed hardest for the University to come here were the victims of their own success.

  29. Minor point, but Palo Alto did have a liquor restriction – 1 1/2 miles from the Stanford campus. The restriction was lifted in the early 70’s. Of course PA is wider than 1 1/2 miles so the restriction did not cover the entire community.SAH

  30. Minor point, but Palo Alto did have a liquor restriction – 1 1/2 miles from the Stanford campus. The restriction was lifted in the early 70’s. Of course PA is wider than 1 1/2 miles so the restriction did not cover the entire community.SAH

  31. Minor point, but Palo Alto did have a liquor restriction – 1 1/2 miles from the Stanford campus. The restriction was lifted in the early 70’s. Of course PA is wider than 1 1/2 miles so the restriction did not cover the entire community.SAH

  32. Minor point, but Palo Alto did have a liquor restriction – 1 1/2 miles from the Stanford campus. The restriction was lifted in the early 70’s. Of course PA is wider than 1 1/2 miles so the restriction did not cover the entire community.SAH

  33. Rich: Yes, the expert is indeed Professor Lofland.

    Anonymous: No, I was never in the military. If that was his reference, it was not clear to me. The subject he was talking about was a Highway patrol officer. I think he should be more careful with what he says, especially as a public official.

  34. Rich: Yes, the expert is indeed Professor Lofland.

    Anonymous: No, I was never in the military. If that was his reference, it was not clear to me. The subject he was talking about was a Highway patrol officer. I think he should be more careful with what he says, especially as a public official.

  35. Rich: Yes, the expert is indeed Professor Lofland.

    Anonymous: No, I was never in the military. If that was his reference, it was not clear to me. The subject he was talking about was a Highway patrol officer. I think he should be more careful with what he says, especially as a public official.

  36. Rich: Yes, the expert is indeed Professor Lofland.

    Anonymous: No, I was never in the military. If that was his reference, it was not clear to me. The subject he was talking about was a Highway patrol officer. I think he should be more careful with what he says, especially as a public official.

  37. Rich Rifkin: I don’t know how big the State Market on 2nd Street was. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was about 800 square feet. Those were the days, though, when markets didn’t sell dairy products…. For milk and cheese and yogurt and so on, we had to order them from the Crystal Dairy, which was located right by the train depot at Second and G…. I remember the excitement of my brother, sister and I running to the front door on the mornings of dairy deliveries, each of us wanting to know what mom had ordered.

    Yes, those were the days indeed. Cut to 2009… Mike Levy’s daughter is now 6 “…I remember the excitement of Davis’ first big box store to open! All 137,000 glorious sq. feet. Why, I could hardly wait to see what ‘Made In China’ goods my daddy was going to buy from Target today. I’m so glad we stopped shopping around our city to buy things that were already available and often cheaper. This way we never have to go anywhere else in town. Gaud I love being a corporate zombie!”

  38. Rich Rifkin: I don’t know how big the State Market on 2nd Street was. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was about 800 square feet. Those were the days, though, when markets didn’t sell dairy products…. For milk and cheese and yogurt and so on, we had to order them from the Crystal Dairy, which was located right by the train depot at Second and G…. I remember the excitement of my brother, sister and I running to the front door on the mornings of dairy deliveries, each of us wanting to know what mom had ordered.

    Yes, those were the days indeed. Cut to 2009… Mike Levy’s daughter is now 6 “…I remember the excitement of Davis’ first big box store to open! All 137,000 glorious sq. feet. Why, I could hardly wait to see what ‘Made In China’ goods my daddy was going to buy from Target today. I’m so glad we stopped shopping around our city to buy things that were already available and often cheaper. This way we never have to go anywhere else in town. Gaud I love being a corporate zombie!”

  39. Rich Rifkin: I don’t know how big the State Market on 2nd Street was. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was about 800 square feet. Those were the days, though, when markets didn’t sell dairy products…. For milk and cheese and yogurt and so on, we had to order them from the Crystal Dairy, which was located right by the train depot at Second and G…. I remember the excitement of my brother, sister and I running to the front door on the mornings of dairy deliveries, each of us wanting to know what mom had ordered.

    Yes, those were the days indeed. Cut to 2009… Mike Levy’s daughter is now 6 “…I remember the excitement of Davis’ first big box store to open! All 137,000 glorious sq. feet. Why, I could hardly wait to see what ‘Made In China’ goods my daddy was going to buy from Target today. I’m so glad we stopped shopping around our city to buy things that were already available and often cheaper. This way we never have to go anywhere else in town. Gaud I love being a corporate zombie!”

  40. Rich Rifkin: I don’t know how big the State Market on 2nd Street was. But if I had to guess, I’d say it was about 800 square feet. Those were the days, though, when markets didn’t sell dairy products…. For milk and cheese and yogurt and so on, we had to order them from the Crystal Dairy, which was located right by the train depot at Second and G…. I remember the excitement of my brother, sister and I running to the front door on the mornings of dairy deliveries, each of us wanting to know what mom had ordered.

    Yes, those were the days indeed. Cut to 2009… Mike Levy’s daughter is now 6 “…I remember the excitement of Davis’ first big box store to open! All 137,000 glorious sq. feet. Why, I could hardly wait to see what ‘Made In China’ goods my daddy was going to buy from Target today. I’m so glad we stopped shopping around our city to buy things that were already available and often cheaper. This way we never have to go anywhere else in town. Gaud I love being a corporate zombie!”

  41. Rexroad is a complete idiot ..but I think you are off base here. He is not saying anything negative about the CHP or talking about hurting anyone.

    His point here is well taken. The CHP Officers on 113 look like they are shooting at cars when they use this radar.

    It has taken two years for me to finally agree with Rexroad on something.

  42. Rexroad is a complete idiot ..but I think you are off base here. He is not saying anything negative about the CHP or talking about hurting anyone.

    His point here is well taken. The CHP Officers on 113 look like they are shooting at cars when they use this radar.

    It has taken two years for me to finally agree with Rexroad on something.

  43. Rexroad is a complete idiot ..but I think you are off base here. He is not saying anything negative about the CHP or talking about hurting anyone.

    His point here is well taken. The CHP Officers on 113 look like they are shooting at cars when they use this radar.

    It has taken two years for me to finally agree with Rexroad on something.

  44. Rexroad is a complete idiot ..but I think you are off base here. He is not saying anything negative about the CHP or talking about hurting anyone.

    His point here is well taken. The CHP Officers on 113 look like they are shooting at cars when they use this radar.

    It has taken two years for me to finally agree with Rexroad on something.

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