City Running Short on Parking Fines

There was an odd moment last night when Finance Director Paul Navazio was presenting an update on the budget, one of the areas that had a shortfall was in public safety. It turned out they were running a deficit on parking fine and vehicle infractions. And we’re not talking about chump change, it was in the tens of thousands if not higher.

Basically right now the city relies on the enforcement of parking violations as a steady source of revenue. What has happened however is that as they have gone to more and more strict systems of enforcement, the revenue has fallen off. With the implementation of the new GPS system and the no re-parking policy, the number of parking citations that have been issued has apparently fallen, moreover the expense of the system has risen. And so there is now a budget shortfall because the number of violations fell short of projections.

You have a catch 22 system going–you have a system that relies on people breaking the law in order to finance it. That seems archaic at best. You want to people to commit fewer not more violations of the law and yet you have budgeted the revenue from parking violations. It is just an odd system.

It seemed that the council acknowledged that this system is problematic at best and that you should not be relying on the revenue from parking violations to make your budget, and so I would guess that in the future they will fix the system.

So this is an item more of bemusement than of true criticism, but you still have to say… only in Davis is a reduction of traffic and parking violations a bad thing. (Actually I’m pretty sure that other cities problem have similar problems).

—Doug Paul Davis reporting

Author

  • David Greenwald

    Greenwald is the founder, editor, and executive director of the Davis Vanguard. He founded the Vanguard in 2006. David Greenwald moved to Davis in 1996 to attend Graduate School at UC Davis in Political Science. He lives in South Davis with his wife Cecilia Escamilla Greenwald and three children.

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Land Use/Open Space

28 comments

  1. The danger of this is that officers may be given a quota of tickets to hand out each week. Instead of giving people warnings, they issue citations.

    Another solution is to get rid of free parking and install parking meters. Then you have revenue + ticket revenue.

  2. The danger of this is that officers may be given a quota of tickets to hand out each week. Instead of giving people warnings, they issue citations.

    Another solution is to get rid of free parking and install parking meters. Then you have revenue + ticket revenue.

  3. The danger of this is that officers may be given a quota of tickets to hand out each week. Instead of giving people warnings, they issue citations.

    Another solution is to get rid of free parking and install parking meters. Then you have revenue + ticket revenue.

  4. The danger of this is that officers may be given a quota of tickets to hand out each week. Instead of giving people warnings, they issue citations.

    Another solution is to get rid of free parking and install parking meters. Then you have revenue + ticket revenue.

  5. This is a self funding activity. They hired more parking officers thinking the higher volume of tickets would cover the cost. Now that ticket volume is down it is time to reduce the number of parking officers.

  6. This is a self funding activity. They hired more parking officers thinking the higher volume of tickets would cover the cost. Now that ticket volume is down it is time to reduce the number of parking officers.

  7. This is a self funding activity. They hired more parking officers thinking the higher volume of tickets would cover the cost. Now that ticket volume is down it is time to reduce the number of parking officers.

  8. This is a self funding activity. They hired more parking officers thinking the higher volume of tickets would cover the cost. Now that ticket volume is down it is time to reduce the number of parking officers.

  9. “Another solution is to get rid of free parking and install parking meters. Then you have revenue + ticket revenue.”

    The problem with parking meters in downtown Davis is that they might discourage people from shopping downtown. That is, if shoppers have the choice of parking for free elsewhere, they might see meters as a big negative.

    I’m not sure if that is the case, though. If we had metered parking in the core, it’s possible that they would encourage parkers to get in and get out more quickly, and as such, would free up more spaces.

    Ideally, we would have a new multi-story parking garage built in downtwon, which can absorb the excess demand. There are plans in the works to rebuild the entire block between E and F and between 3rd and 4th. While there is a grade level city lot there now, the idea (as I understand the plan) is to convert the entire core of that block into a large parking garage, with retail buildings fronting the streets. As far as a timeline goes for this proposal, I don’t know where things stand.

    I suppose more ideally than that, people would just ride bicycles.

  10. “Another solution is to get rid of free parking and install parking meters. Then you have revenue + ticket revenue.”

    The problem with parking meters in downtown Davis is that they might discourage people from shopping downtown. That is, if shoppers have the choice of parking for free elsewhere, they might see meters as a big negative.

    I’m not sure if that is the case, though. If we had metered parking in the core, it’s possible that they would encourage parkers to get in and get out more quickly, and as such, would free up more spaces.

    Ideally, we would have a new multi-story parking garage built in downtwon, which can absorb the excess demand. There are plans in the works to rebuild the entire block between E and F and between 3rd and 4th. While there is a grade level city lot there now, the idea (as I understand the plan) is to convert the entire core of that block into a large parking garage, with retail buildings fronting the streets. As far as a timeline goes for this proposal, I don’t know where things stand.

    I suppose more ideally than that, people would just ride bicycles.

  11. “Another solution is to get rid of free parking and install parking meters. Then you have revenue + ticket revenue.”

    The problem with parking meters in downtown Davis is that they might discourage people from shopping downtown. That is, if shoppers have the choice of parking for free elsewhere, they might see meters as a big negative.

    I’m not sure if that is the case, though. If we had metered parking in the core, it’s possible that they would encourage parkers to get in and get out more quickly, and as such, would free up more spaces.

    Ideally, we would have a new multi-story parking garage built in downtwon, which can absorb the excess demand. There are plans in the works to rebuild the entire block between E and F and between 3rd and 4th. While there is a grade level city lot there now, the idea (as I understand the plan) is to convert the entire core of that block into a large parking garage, with retail buildings fronting the streets. As far as a timeline goes for this proposal, I don’t know where things stand.

    I suppose more ideally than that, people would just ride bicycles.

  12. “Another solution is to get rid of free parking and install parking meters. Then you have revenue + ticket revenue.”

    The problem with parking meters in downtown Davis is that they might discourage people from shopping downtown. That is, if shoppers have the choice of parking for free elsewhere, they might see meters as a big negative.

    I’m not sure if that is the case, though. If we had metered parking in the core, it’s possible that they would encourage parkers to get in and get out more quickly, and as such, would free up more spaces.

    Ideally, we would have a new multi-story parking garage built in downtwon, which can absorb the excess demand. There are plans in the works to rebuild the entire block between E and F and between 3rd and 4th. While there is a grade level city lot there now, the idea (as I understand the plan) is to convert the entire core of that block into a large parking garage, with retail buildings fronting the streets. As far as a timeline goes for this proposal, I don’t know where things stand.

    I suppose more ideally than that, people would just ride bicycles.

  13. I really see two issues here. The issue I was really raising was a fiscal issue and the wisdom of relying on revenue from parking violations.

    The other issue is the parking issue in Davis. I grew up in a city with parking meters, it was a pain but not overly expensive. Parking garages are a bit easier as you just pay at the end.

    Is there enough parking in the right places in Davis? I know there is plenty of available parking in the garage on G street, but I’m rarely on that side of downtown.

  14. I really see two issues here. The issue I was really raising was a fiscal issue and the wisdom of relying on revenue from parking violations.

    The other issue is the parking issue in Davis. I grew up in a city with parking meters, it was a pain but not overly expensive. Parking garages are a bit easier as you just pay at the end.

    Is there enough parking in the right places in Davis? I know there is plenty of available parking in the garage on G street, but I’m rarely on that side of downtown.

  15. I really see two issues here. The issue I was really raising was a fiscal issue and the wisdom of relying on revenue from parking violations.

    The other issue is the parking issue in Davis. I grew up in a city with parking meters, it was a pain but not overly expensive. Parking garages are a bit easier as you just pay at the end.

    Is there enough parking in the right places in Davis? I know there is plenty of available parking in the garage on G street, but I’m rarely on that side of downtown.

  16. I really see two issues here. The issue I was really raising was a fiscal issue and the wisdom of relying on revenue from parking violations.

    The other issue is the parking issue in Davis. I grew up in a city with parking meters, it was a pain but not overly expensive. Parking garages are a bit easier as you just pay at the end.

    Is there enough parking in the right places in Davis? I know there is plenty of available parking in the garage on G street, but I’m rarely on that side of downtown.

  17. Folks, parking enforcement is not supposed to be a zero-sum game here. The City would still spend money for parking officers (even if they wrote *zero* tickets) to ensure the turnover of parking spaces. This is the City’s “cost of doing business” in promoting the healthy, vibrant Downtown that we have. If the City was really hard-up for $$$, we’d be seeing parking meters spring up like those found in Chico, San Luis Obispo, and other college towns.

  18. Folks, parking enforcement is not supposed to be a zero-sum game here. The City would still spend money for parking officers (even if they wrote *zero* tickets) to ensure the turnover of parking spaces. This is the City’s “cost of doing business” in promoting the healthy, vibrant Downtown that we have. If the City was really hard-up for $$$, we’d be seeing parking meters spring up like those found in Chico, San Luis Obispo, and other college towns.

  19. Folks, parking enforcement is not supposed to be a zero-sum game here. The City would still spend money for parking officers (even if they wrote *zero* tickets) to ensure the turnover of parking spaces. This is the City’s “cost of doing business” in promoting the healthy, vibrant Downtown that we have. If the City was really hard-up for $$$, we’d be seeing parking meters spring up like those found in Chico, San Luis Obispo, and other college towns.

  20. Folks, parking enforcement is not supposed to be a zero-sum game here. The City would still spend money for parking officers (even if they wrote *zero* tickets) to ensure the turnover of parking spaces. This is the City’s “cost of doing business” in promoting the healthy, vibrant Downtown that we have. If the City was really hard-up for $$$, we’d be seeing parking meters spring up like those found in Chico, San Luis Obispo, and other college towns.

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